Trademark Law: Protection, Enforcement, and Licensing

Front Cover
Adam L. Brookman
Aspen Publishers Online, 1999 - Law - 1174 pages
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This is the first practical treatise of its kind to approach trademark law from a fully integrated legal and business perspective. It walks you through the major areas of trademark practice: selecting and adopting trademarks; perfecting, exploiting, and maintaining trademark rights, asserting and defending against trademark claims; and business issues in trademark ownership. You'll find clear, concise explanations and illustrative case examples to help you take a course of action in the full range of business scenarios. This book covers every key area, including trademark selection and adoption
-- trademark registration
-- trade dress; conducting due diligence
-- fair use of the trademarks of others
-- enforcement letters
-- and more.
  

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Contents

Business and Legal Strategies for Picking
2-1
Part IV
2-12
Adoption and Use of Trademarks for Products
3-1
Trademark Protection in General
4-1
Trademark Registration
5-1
Trade Dress of Products and Services
5-67
Trademark Issues and the Internet
7-1
Opposition and Cancellation Proceedings
8-1
Chapter 10
10-1
Chapter 11
11-1
Chapter 12
12-1
Chapter 13
13-1
Chapter 14
14-1
Business Issues in Trademark Ownership
A-1
Table of Cases
TW-1
Index
1-5

Part III
8-14
Asserting and Defending Against Trademark Claims
9-1

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Page viii - trade-mark" includes any word, name, symbol, or device or any combination thereof adopted and used by a manufacturer or merchant to identify his goods and distinguish them from those manufactured or sold by others.
Page vii - Partnership (section 99), says that "good will may be properly enough described to be the advantage or benefit which is acquired by an establishment beyond the mere value of the capital stock, funds, or property employed therein, in consequence of the general public patronage and encouragement which it receives from constant or habitual customers, on account of its local position, or common celebrity, or reputation for skill or affluence, or punctuality, or from other accidental circumstances or...

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