The Economy of Nature Explained and Illustrated: On the Principles of Modern Philosophy. By G. Gregory, ... In Three Volumes. With Fifty-six Plates (Google eBook)

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J. Johnson, 1798
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Page 498 - The true genius is a mind of large general powers, accidentally determined to some particular direction.
Page 429 - When we set before our eyes a round globe of any uniform colour, vg gold, alabaster, or jet, it is certain that the idea thereby imprinted in our mind is of a flat circle variously shadowed, with several degrees of light and brightness coming to our eyes. But we having by use been accustomed to perceive...
Page 427 - For in a discourse of our present civil war, what could seem more impertinent, than to ask, as one did, what was the value of a Roman penny? Yet the coherence to me was manifest enough. For the thought of the war, introduced the thought of the delivering up the king to his enemies; the thought of that, brought in the thought of the delivering up of Christ; and that again the thought of the thirty pence, which was the price of that treason; and thence easily followed that malicious question, and all...
Page 480 - ... that the angles of a triangle are equal to two right angles...
Page 167 - The foletis, or gaftrocnemius internus, allb arifes by two heads; one from the upper and back part of the head of the fibula, the other from the upper and pofterior part of the tibia..
Page 46 - ... bottom, for the molasses to drain through, but which at first is closed with a plug. When the sugar in these pots is cool, and becomes a fixed body, which is discoverable by the middle of the top falling in (generally about twelve hours from the first potting of the hot sugar), the plug is taken out, and the pot placed over a large jar intended to receive the syrup or molasses that drains from it.
Page 77 - ... by mere expofure to the air. If we put a quantity of this animal oil, well rectified, and confequently clear, limpid, and tranfparent, into a bell-glafs filled with oxygen gas over mercury, in a fhort time the gas is much...
Page 505 - This power which the mind has thus to order the consideration of any idea, or the forbearing to consider it; or to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest, and vice versa, in any particular instance; is that which we call the will. The actual exercise of that power, by directing any particular action, or its forbearance, is that which we call volition or willing.
Page 21 - Some botanifts have conceived, that plants, as well as animals, have a regular circulation of their fluids. Others think this very improbable. On both fides, recourfe has been had to experiments ; and from thefe, conclufions perfectly oppofite have been deduced. When a ligature has been fixed round a tree, in fuch a manner, that no juice could be tranfmitted through the bark, the tree has been found to thicken above the ligature; but below it, to continue of the fame circumference. Hence fome have...
Page 489 - A young man, of the town of Chartres, between the age of twenty-three and twenty-four, the son of a tradesman, and deaf and dumb from his birth, began to speak all of a sudden to the great astonishment of the whole town.

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