The Secret Garden Book and Charm

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Apr 30, 1998 - Juvenile Fiction - 368 pages
3 Reviews
What secrets lie behind the doors at Misselthwaite Manor? Recently arrived at her uncle's estate, orphaned Mary Lennox is spoiled, sickly, and certain she won't enjoy living there. Then she discovers the arched doorway into an overgrown garden, shut up since the death of her aunt ten years earlier. Mary soon begins transforming it into a thing of beauty--unaware that she is changing too.

But Misselthwaite hides another secret, as mary discovers one night. High in a dark room, away from the rest of the house, lies her young cousin, Colin, who believes he is an incurable invalid, destined to die young. His tantrums are so frightful, no one can reason with him. If only, Mary hopes, she can get Colin to love the secret garden as much as she does, its magic will work wonders on him.

  

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I LOVE this book i think i have read it about 6 times and i'm reading it again so i guess 7 times

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amazeing book i could read it over and over again

Contents

Magic
279
Let Them Laugh
296
The Curtain
313
the Garden
330
Copyright

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Page 130 - Mary, Mary, quite contrary, How does your garden grow? With silver bells, and cockle shells, And pretty maids all in a row.
Page 1 - When Mary Lennox was sent to Misselthwaite Manor to live with her uncle everybody said she was the most disagreeable-looking child ever seen. It was true, too. She had a little thin face and a little thin body, thin light hair and a sour expression. Her hair was yellow, and her face was yellow because she had been born in India and had always been ill in one way or another.
Page 25 - That's the wind blowing through the bushes," Mrs. Medlock said. "It's a wild, dreary enough place to my mind, though there's plenty that likes itó particularly when the heather's in bloom." On and on they drove through the darkness, and though the rain stopped, the wind rushed by and whistled and made strange sounds. The road went up and down, and several times the carriage passed over a little bridge beneath which water rushed very fast with a great deal of noise. Mary felt as if the drive would...
Page 45 - Where has tha' been, tha' cheeky little beggar?" he said. "I've not seen thee before today. Has tha' begun tha' courtin' this early in th' season? Tha'rt too forrad." The bird put his tiny head on one side and looked up at him with his soft bright eye which was like a black dewdrop. He seemed quite familiar and not the least afraid. He hopped about and pecked the earth briskly, looking for seeds and insects. It actually gave Mary a queer feeling in her heart, because he was so pretty and cheerful...
Page 47 - It is a Yorkshire habit to say what you think with blunt frankness, and old Ben Weatherstaff was a Yorkshire moor man. "Tha' an' me are a good bit alike," he said. "We was wove out of th' same cloth. We're neither of us good lookin' an' we're both of us as sour as we look. We've got the same nasty tempers, both of us, I'll warrant.
Page 74 - It's my day out today an' I'm goin' home. Eh! I am glad. Mrs. Medlock thinks a lot o' mother. Perhaps she could talk to her." "I like your mother," said Mary. "I should think tha' did," agreed Martha, polishing away. "I've never seen her," said Mary. "No, tha' hasn't," replied Martha. She sat up on her heels again and rubbed the end of her nose with the back of her hand as if puzzled for a moment, but she ended quite positively. "Well, she's that sensible^ an' hard workin' an' goodnatured an' clean...
Page 122 - Come with me and I'll show you," she said. She led him round the laurel path and to the walk where the ivy grew so thickly. Dickon followed her with a queer, almost pitying, look on his face. He felt as if he were being led to look at some strange bird's nest and must move softly. When she stepped to the wall and lifted the hanging ivy he started. There was a door and Mary pushed it slowly open and they passed in together, and then Mary stood and waved her hand round defiantly. "It's this," she said....
Page 153 - What a queer house! Everything is a kind of secret. Rooms are locked up and gardens are locked upó and you! Have you been locked up?" "No. I stay in this room because I don't want to be moved out of it. It tires me too much." "Does your father come and see you?" Mary ventured. "Sometimes. Generally when I am asleep. He doesn't want to see me.
Page 214 - I didn't know," ventured the nurse, "that he thought he had a lump on his spine. His back is weak because he en won't try to sit up. I could have told him there was no lump there." Colin gulped and turned his face a little to look at her. "C-could you?" he said pathetically. "Yes, sir.
Page 90 - The robin flew from his swinging spray of ivy on to the top of the wall and he opened his beak and sang a loud, lovely trill, merely to show off. Nothing in the world is quite as adorably lovely as a robin when he shows off ó and they are nearly always doing it. Mary Lennox had heard a great deal about Magic6 in her Ayah's stories, and she always said that what happened almost at that moment was Magic.

About the author (1998)

Frances Hodgson Burnett (1849-1924) grew up in England, but she began writing what was to become The Secret Garden in 1909, when she was creating a garden for a new home in Long Island, New York. Burnett was already established as a novelist for adults when she turned to writing for children. Little Lord Fauntleroy, written for her two young boys; the play A Little Princess, which became the basis for the novel of the same name; and The Secret Garden are the works for which she is most warmly remembered.

Author and illustrator Tasha Tudor was born in Boston, Massachusetts on August 28, 1915. Her first book, Pumpkin Moonshine, was published in 1938. Since then she has written or illustrated almost 100 books including her most recent title Corgiville Christmas, which was published in 2003. She won numerous awards throughout her lifetime including the Catholic Library Association's Regina Medal, the Walter Cerf Award for Lifetime Achievements in the Arts from the Vermont Arts Council, and Caldecott Honors for Mother Goose in 1945 and 1 Is One in 1957. She also created Christmas cards for the Irene Dash Greeting Card Company. She died on June 18, 2008.

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