The Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott, Baronet, Volume 5 (Google eBook)

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A. Constable, 1821 - English poetry
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Page 175 - Seems as, to me, of all bereft, Sole friends thy woods and streams were left; And thus I love them better still, Even in extremity of ill. By Yarrow's streams still let me stray, Though none should guide my feeble way; Still feel the breeze down Ettricke break, Although it chill my
Page 175 - break, Although it chill my wither'd cheek ; Still lay my head by Teviot stone, Though there, forgotten and alone, The Bard may draw his parting groan. III. Not scorn'd like me ! to Branksome Hall The Minstrels came, at festive call; Trooping they came, from near and far, The jovial priests of mirth and war;
Page 50 - A wizard, of such dreaded fame, " That when, in Salamanca's cave, " Him listed his magic wand to wave, " The bells would ring in Notre Dame ! " Some of his skill he taught to me; " And, Warrior, I could say to thee " The words that cleft Eildon hills in three,
Page 14 - head. But when he caught the measure wild, The old man raised his face, and smiled . And lighten'd up his faded eye, With all a poet's ecstacy ! In varying cadence, soft or strong, He swept the sounding chords along : The present scene, the future lot, His toils, his wants, were all forgot Cold diffidence, and age's frost, In the
Page 399 - With scutcheons of silver the coffin is shielded, And pages stand mute by the canopied pall: Through the courts, at deep midnight, the torches are gleaming; In the proudly-arch'd chapel the banners are beaming; Far adown the long aisle sacred music is streaming, Lamenting a Chief of the People should fall.
Page 17 - lay down to rest, With corslet laced, Pillow'd on buckler cold and hard; They carved at the meal With gloves of steel, And they drank the red wine through the helmet barr'd. V. Ten squires, ten yeomen, mail-clad men, Waited the beck of the warders ten
Page 206 - broad, Blackandro's oak, The aged Harper's soul awoke ! Then would he sing achievements high, And circumstance of chivalry, Till the rapt traveller would stay, Forgetful of the closing day ; And noble youths, the strain to hear, Forsook the hunting of the deer ; And Yarrow, as he roll'd along, Bore burden to the Minstrel's song. NOTES.
Page 205 - wakes from clay, Be THOU the trembling sinner's stay, Though heaven and earth shall pass away ! HUSH'D is the harp—the Minstrel gone. And did he wander forth alone ? ,'^.'• Alone, in indigence and age, To linger out his pilgrimage ? No:—close beneath proud Newark's tower, Arose the Minstrel's lowly bower; A simple hut; but there was seen The little garden hedged with green, There
Page 194 - Moor, moor the barge, ye gallant crew! " And, gentle ladye, deign to stay ! " Rest thee in Castle Ravensheuch, " Nor tempt the stormy firth to-day. " The blackening wave is edged with white; " To inch* and rock the sea-mews fly; " The fishers have heard the Water Sprite, " Whose screams forebode that wreck is nigh. " Last night the gifted Seer did view
Page 196 - St Clair. There are twenty of Roslin's barons bold Lie buried within that proud chapelle; Each one the holy vault doth hold— But the sea holds lovely Rosabelle ! And each St Clair was buried there, With candle, with book, and with knell;

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