Inquire Within for Anything You Want to Know (Google eBook)

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Dick & Fitzgerald, 1858 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 434 pages
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Page 403 - I see by little and little more of what is to be done, and how it is to be done, should I ever be able to do it.
Page 153 - A ploughman on his legs is higher than a gentleman on his knees, as Poor Richard says. Perhaps they have had a small estate left them, which they knew not the getting of; they think 'Tis day, and will never be night...
Page 153 - Pride is as loud a beggar as Want, and a great deal more saucy.' When you have bought one fine thing, you must buy ten more, that your appearance may be all of a piece ; but poor Dick says, ' It is easier to suppress the first desire than to satisfy all that follow it.
Page 153 - He means, that perhaps the cheapness is apparent only, and not real; or the bargain, by straitening thee in thy business, may do thee more harm than good. For in another place he says, Many have been ruined by buying good pennyworths.
Page 344 - I returned ; and, loosing from the stake the string with the little stick which was fastened to it, went again into the water, where I found, that, lying on my back and holding the stick in my hands, I was drawn along the surface of the water in a very agreeable manner. Having then engaged another boy to carry my clothes round the pond...
Page 152 - So much for industry, my friends, and attention to one's own business, but to these we must add frugality if we would make our industry more certainly successful. A man may, if he knows not how to save as he gets, "keep his nose all his life to the grindstone, and die not worth a groat at last. A fat kitchen makes a lean will," and " Many estates are spent in the getting, Since women for tea forsook spinning and knitting, And men for punch forsook hewing and splitting.
Page 145 - Kind words also produce their own image on men's souls; and a beautiful image it is. They soothe, and quiet, and comfort the hearer. They shame him out of his sour, morose, unkind feelings. We have not yet begun to use kind words in such abundance as they ought to be used.
Page 209 - Who to his plighted vows and trust has ever firmly stood ; And though he promise to his loss, he makes his promise good.
Page 63 - Take half bushel of nice unslacked lime, slack i with boiling water, cover it during the process to keep in the steam. Strain the liquid through a fine sieve or strainer, and add to it a peck of salt, previously well dissolved in warm water ; three pounds of ground rice, boiled to a thin paste, and stirred in boiling hot ; half a pound of powdered Spanish whiting, and a pound of clean glue, which has been...
Page 211 - Peel and cut into very small pieces three onions, three turnips, one carrot, and four potatoes, put them into a stewpan with a quarter of a pound of butter, the same of lean ham, and a bunch of parsley, pass them ten minutes over a sharp fire ; then add a...

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