Breath: Poems and Letters

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Wesleyan University Press, Oct 1, 2002 - Literary Collections - 196 pages
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At the start of a promising career, Antonia Pozzi (1912-1938) committed suicide, leaving behind several hundred poems known only to her closest friends. The posthumous publication of this work led Eugenio Montale to praise Pozzi's "desire to reduce the weight of words to the minimum." Her Modernist verse is lyrical and experimental, pastoral and erotic, powerfully evoking the northern Italian landscape and her personal tragedies amid the repressive climate of Fascism. Breath contains a representative selection of Pozzi's poems in an Italian/ English bilingual format along with a number of her letters. In an introductory essay, editor-translator Lawrence Venuti documents her tormented life, considers her sophisticated thinking about her writing, and sketches the rich literary traditions that she inherited, creating a detailed context in which her poems can be more fully appreciated. The translations affiliate Pozzi's poetry with the work of comparable English-language writers such as H.D., Mina Loy, and Lorine Niedecker, establishing in translation what Pozzi lacked in Italian: a tradition of Modernist women's poetries.

CONTRIBUTORS: Lawrence Venuti.
  

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Contents

Paura
20
Abbandono
70
Infanzia
86
Altura
100
Grillo
114
The women
127
Outskirts
143
Fog
157
To Antonio Maria Cervi n January 1930
173
To Antonio Maria Cervi 1115 February 1934
179
To Maria Cavagna Sangiuliani 18 July 1938
186
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
195
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About the author (2002)

Lawrence Venuti is Professor of English at Temple University. His latest books include The Scandals of Translation: Towards an Ethics of Difference (1998) and the translation of Juan Rodolfo Wilcock's The Temple of Iconoclasts (2000).

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