Never Done: A History of American Housework

Front Cover
Macmillan, Nov 1, 2000 - History - 384 pages
10 Reviews
Finally back in print, with a new Preface by the author, this lively, authoritative, and pathbreaking study considers the history of material advances and domestic service, the "women's separate sphere," and the respective influences of advertising, home economics, and women's entry into the workforce. Never Done begins by describing the household chores of nineteenth-century America: cooking at fireplaces and on cast-iron stoves, laundry done with boilers and flatirons, endless water-hauling and fire-tending, and so on. Strasser goes on to explain and explore how industrialization transformed the nature of women's work. Easing some tasks and eliminating others, new commercial processes inexorably altered women's daily lives and relationshipsówith each other and with those they served.
  

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Review: Never Done: A History of American Housework

User Review  - Donna Morrison - Goodreads

An informative and well researched document tracing the changes technology and innovation have had on our daily lives. Read full review

Review: Never Done: A History of American Housework

User Review  - Marissa Patterson - Goodreads

Fascinating! Read full review

Contents

DAILY BREAD
11
OUT OF THE FRYING PAN
32
THE HOME FIRES
50
AT THE FLICK OF A SWITCH
67
FETCH A FAIL OF WATER
85
BLUE MONDAY
104
A STITCH IN TIME
125
THE BOARDER
145
THE BUSINESS OF HOUSEKEEPING
202
WHEN THE BOUGH BREAKS
224
SELLING MRS CONSUMER
242
QUICK AND EASY
263
YOU DESERVE A BREAK
282
LIFE ON THE MARKET
300
SOURCE NOTES
313
PICTURE CREDITS
352

MISTRESS AND MAID
162
REDEEMING WOMANS PROFESSION
180

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About the author (2000)

Susan Strasser is the author of Waste and Want: A Social History of Trash and Satisfaction Guaranteed: The Making of the American Mass Market. Her articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Nation. A professor of history at the University of Delaware, she lives near Washington, D.C.

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