Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 1 - 10 of 45 on An inland country, naturally fertile and easily cultivated, produces a great surplus....  
" An inland country, naturally fertile and easily cultivated, produces a great surplus of provisions beyond what is necessary for maintaining the cultivators, and on account of the expense of land carriage, and inconveniency of river navigation, it may... "
PRINCIPLES OF SOCIAL SCIENCE - Page 292
by H.C. CAREY - 1858
Full view - About this book

Henry C. Carey and American Economic Development

Rodney Morrison - 2007 - 91 pages
...located. Underlying this structure were the thoughts of Adam Smith, whom Carey quoted at length. An island country, naturally fertile and easily cultivated,...and on account of the expense of land carriage, and the inconveniency of river navigation, it may frequently be difficult to send this surplus abroad....
Full view - About this book

An inquiry into the nature and causes of the wealth of nations, Volume 2

Adam Smith - Economics - 1786
...provifions beyond what is necefiary for maintaining the cultivators, and on account of the expence of land carriage, and inconveniency of river navigation; it may frequently be difficult to fend this furplus abroad". Abundance, therefore, renders provifions cheap, and encourages a great number...
Full view - About this book

An inquiry into the nature and causes of the wealth of nations, Volume 2

Adam Smith - Economics - 1789
...pro vifions beyond wha-t is necefTary fqr maintaining the cultivators, And on account of the expence of land carriage, and inconveniency of river navigation, it may frequently be difficult to fend this furplus abroad. Abundance, therefore, renders provifions cheap, and encourages a great number...
Full view - About this book

An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, Volume 2

Adam Smith, Garnier (M., Germain) - Economics - 1811
...great, but at a considerable distance from the sea-coast, and sometimes even from all water carriage. An inland country, naturally fertile and easily cultivated,...encourages a great number of workmen to settle in the neighbourhood, who find that their industry can there procure them more of the necessaries and conveniences...
Full view - About this book

An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, Volume 2

Adam Smith - 1811
...great, but at a considerable distance from the sea-coast, and sometimes even from all'water carriage. An inland country, naturally fertile and easily cultivated,...maintaining the cultivators ; and on account of the cxpence of land carriage, and inconveniency of river navigation, it may frequently be difficult to...
Full view - About this book

The Works of Adam Smith: The nature and causes of the wealth of nations

Adam Smith - Economics - 1811
...pro. vifions beyond what is neceffary for maintaining the cultivators, and on account of the expence of land carriage, and inconveniency of river navigation, it may frequently be difficult to fend this furplus abroad. Abundance, therefore, renders provifions cheap, and encourages a great number...
Full view - About this book

An inquiry into the nature and causes of the wealth of nations. With a comm ...

Adam Smith - 1836
...great, but at a considerable distance from the sea-coast, and sometimes even from all water carriage. An inland country, naturally fertile and easily cultivated,...encourages a great number of workmen to settle in the neighbourhood, who find that their industry can there procure them more of the necessaries and conveniencies...
Full view - About this book

Public economy for the United States

Calvin Colton - Economics - 1848 - 536 pages
...coasting crnfl in our ports. They come and go in clouds. Adam Smith has well said on this subject: "An inland country, naturally fertile and easily cultivated,...great surplus of provisions beyond what is necessary to maintain the cultivators. Abundance renders provisions cheap, and encourages a great number of workmen...
Full view - About this book

The American Whig Review, Volume 12

1850
...all, to foreign commerce." The natural tendency of the loom to go to the. plough is thus exhibited. "An inland country, naturally fertile and easily cultivated,...cultivators; and on account of the expense of land carnage, and inconveniency of river navigation, it may frequently be difficult to send this surplus...
Full view - About this book

The slave trade, domestic and foreign: why it exists, and how it may be ...

Henry Charles Carey - Economics - 1853 - 426 pages
...seek to take their place by the side of the plough and harrow, is thus exhibited by ADAM SMITH : " An inland country, naturally fertile and easily cultivated,...encourages a great number of workmen to settle in the neighbourhood, who find that their industry can there procure them more of the necessaries and conveniences...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF