Communicating Myths of the Golden Age Comedia

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Bucknell University Press, 1998 - Drama - 236 pages
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These dialogues express different world visions. If the expected cultural exchange takes place, then an enduring relationship of tolerance and understanding forms between the two worlds. Bonds that surpass temporal, geographic, and philosophical specificity attest to humankind's universal and atemporal need for myth. The questions, proposed answers, and subsequent revisions will, it is hoped, coexist in an ongoing dialogue among ancient, Golden Age, and contemporary individuals.
  

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Contents

II
48
III
62
V
79
VI
94
VII
110
VIII
121
IX
138
XI
154
XIII
172
XIV
192
XV
196
XVI
212
XVII
223
XVIII
234
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Page 17 - The text is a tissue of quotations drawn from the innumerable centres of culture. . . . [T]he writer can only imitate a gesture that is always anterior, never original. His only power is to mix writings, to counter the ones with the others, in such a way as never to rest on any one of them.
Page 31 - [T]wo entirely coherent but entirely incompatible readings can be made to hinge on one line whose grammatical structure is devoid of ambiguity but whose rhetorical mode turns the mood as well as the mode of the entire poem upside down.
Page 38 - those modes of feeling, valuing, perceiving, and believing which have some kind of relation to the maintenance and reproduction of social power.
Page 19 - The position of the anthropologist of today resembles in some sort the position of classical scholars at the revival of learning

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