Wild scenes in a hunter's life: including Cumming's adventures among the lions, and other wild animals of Africa, etc. : with three hundred illustrations (Google eBook)

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Derby & Miller, 1851 - Hunting - 460 pages
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Page 103 - She went off a second time as before, and having crawled a few paces, looked again behind her, and for some time stood moaning. But still her cubs not rising to follow her, she returned to them again, and with signs of inexpressible fondness, went round one and round the other, pawing them and moaning.
Page 86 - A beautiful meadow about half a mile wide, enamelled with yellowed autumnal flowers, stretched for two or three miles along the foot of the hills, bordered on the opposite side by the river, whose banks were fringed with cotton-wood trees, the bright foliage of which refreshed and delighted...
Page 217 - ... time fly the hawks; but if a herd, they wait till the dogs have fixed on a particular antelope. The hawks, skimming along near the ground, soon reach the deer, at whose head they pounce in succession, and sometimes with a violence that knocks it over. At all events, they confuse the animal so much as to stop its speed in such a degree that the dogs can come up ; and in an instant men, horses, dogs, and hawks, surround the unfortunate deer, against which their united efforts have been combined....
Page 290 - Will the unicorn be willing to serve thee, or abide by thy crib ? Canst thou bind the unicorn with his band in the furrow ? or will he harrow the valleys after thee...
Page 120 - ... the herd by degrees, raising their legs very slowly but setting them down somewhat suddenly after the manner of a deer, and always taking care to lift their right or left feet simultaneously. If any of the herd leave off feeding to gaze upon this extraordinary phenomenon it instantly stops and the head begins to play its part by licking its shoulders and performing other necessary movements. In this way the hunters attain the very centre of the herd without exciting suspicion and have leisure...
Page 314 - I never recur to this my first day's elephant shooting without regretting my folly in contenting myself with securing only one elephant. The first was now dying, and could not leave the ground, and the second was also mortally wounded, and I had only to follow and finish her ; but I foolishly allowed her to escape, while I amused myself with the first, which kept walking backward, and standing by every tree she passed.
Page 316 - One of the most striking things connected with the lion is his voice, which is extremely grand and peculiarly striking. It consists at times of a low, deep moaning, repeated five or six times, ending in faintly audible sighs ; at other times he startles the forest with loud, deeptoned, solemn roars, repeated five or six times in quick succession, each increasing in loudness to the third or fourth, when his voice dies away in five or six low, muffled sounds, very much resembling distant thunder.
Page 146 - ... that general Visitation of God, Who saw that all that He had made was good, that is, conformable to His Will, which abhors deformity, and is the rule of order and beauty.
Page 89 - Catesby, after stating that they range in droves, feeding on the open savannahs morning and evening, says that in the sultry time of the day they retire to shady rivulets and streams of clear water gliding through thickets of tall canes. Dr. James had an opportunity of observing them on such occasions, and he thus describes their march : " In the middle of the day countless thousands of them were seen coming in from every quarter to the stagnant pools ;" and in another place he says, that their...
Page 217 - ... at a rate that seems swifter than the wind ; the horsemen are instantly at full speed, having slipped the dogs. If it is a single deer, 'they at the same time fly the hawks; but if a herd, they wait till the dogs have fixed on a particular antelope. The hawks, skimming along near the ground, soon reach the deer, at whose head they pounce in succession, and sometimes with a violence that knocks it over.

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