A History of the Percheron Horse: Including Hitherto Unpublished Data Concerning the Origin and Development of the Modern Type of Heavy Draft, Drawn from Authentic Documents, Records and Manuscripts in the National Archives of the French Government, Together with a Detailed Account of the Introduction and Dissemination of the Breed Throughout the United States, to which is Appended a Symposium Reflecting the View of Leading Contemporary Importers and Breeders Touching the Selection, Feeding and General Management of Stallions, Brood Mares and Foals (Google eBook)

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Breeder's Gazette Print, 1917 - Percheron horse - 602 pages
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Page 176 - He felt the rising of the great tide of live stock improvement that swept through the mid-west states during the years immediately following the close of the Civil War. The state fairs were beginning to attract good exhibits. Shorthorn cattle, "Norman" and trotting horses, as well as "Magie" swine, were seen and talked about.
Page 61 - These two valuable stock-getters, both gray, again gave tone and ardor to the Percheron race, and transformed definitely into gray horses the stock of the entire country, which had, it was said, become less uniform, and of all colors.
Page 179 - As a result of the discussion which ensued, the following resolution was passed : Resolved, that in the opinion of this...
Page 229 - To preserve and perpetuate the valuable qualities of the Percheron race against invasion from all sources is one of the missions of this society. In order to accomplish this purpose, it becomes necessary thoroughly to investigate all elements of breeding that have contributed to the grand...
Page 528 - A mare weighing from 1,700 to 1,800 pounds in ordinarily good condition is the draft mare that may be expected to give a good account of herself both at work and in the stud. Get size in the offspring through the selection of the sire and through the kind, quality and quantity of feed given the colts. Fortunately, it is among these under excessive weights that we find the...
Page 31 - prescription," or " title by prescription ; " and more accurately describes what is commonly called " time immemorial," which means, says Littleton, " that no living witness hath heard any proof or had any knowledge to the contrary...
Page 44 - Panacea, but it had not been before examined, we believe, for arsenic; at any rate, so far as we know, this is the first time that the presence of that poison has been detected in it by chemical analysis. We have long been satisfied, however, of the variable composition of the panacea, and it seems probable that it sometimes contains both the corrosive sublimate and arsenic ; sometimes only one of them, and at others neither. So perfect...
Page 494 - Journal," of London, November 17, 1916, from which we quote the following: " In the meantime the Percheron type has made many friends in England. The breed, mostly represented, it is true, by ' grade ' horses as yet, is firmly established in the hearts and minds of the responsible officers of the British army, for go where one will in army circles he hears nothing but praise for a horse that has proved his sterling worth in artillery. East and west, north and south the story is the same; the half...
Page 229 - ... their pedigrees, that we may see what strains of blood, which families and what orders of union have been prolific of the greatest benefits in the past, thus establishing invaluable precedents from which more intelligently to shape our future course, and with greater degrees of certainty arrive at the desired ends. These investigations have shown us that the improvements of the past necessary to meet the changing demands have been accomplished by selecting animals best suited to the new requirements,...
Page 529 - The size of the bone may well bo considered, though too much stress frequently has been placed upon mere size. It is the quality, however, which counts. We want a clean, flat, hard, flinty bone, and enough of it to hold up the mare and carry her on any work she may be called upon to do. It is desirable also that the front legs should not cut under too much just below and back of the knee.

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