The Retrospective review [ed. by H. Southern]. (Google eBook)

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Henry Southern
1820
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Page 196 - The intelligible forms of ancient poets, The fair humanities of old religion, The power, the beauty, and the majesty...
Page 84 - Yes, trust them not, for there is an upstart crow, beautified with our feathers, that with his tiger's heart wrapped in a player's hide, supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you; and being an absolute Johannes Factotum, is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country.
Page 69 - Whose honours with increase of ages grow, As streams roll down, enlarging as they flow; Nations unborn your mighty names shall sound, And worlds applaud that must not yet be found!
Page 339 - I would not, with my will, present you sorrows, dear Bess ; let them go to the grave with me, and be buried in the dust : and seeing that it is not the will of God that I shall see you any more, bear my destruction patiently, and with a heart like yourself.
Page 193 - Raptores orbis, postquam cuncta vastantibus defuere terrae, et. mare scrutantur : si locuples hostis est, avari ; si pauper, ambitiosi : quos non Oriens, non Occidens, satiaverit. Soli omnium opes atque inopiam pari affectu concupiscunt. Auferre, trucidare, rapere, falsis nominibus imperium ; atque, ubi solitudinem faciunt, pacem appellant.
Page 196 - They live no longer in the faith of reason ! But still the heart doth need a language, still Doth the old instinct bring back the old names, And to yon starry world they now are gone, Spirits or gods, that used to share this earth With man as with their friend ; and to the lover Yonder they move, from yonder visible sky Shoot influence down : and even at this day 'Tis Jupiter who brings whate'er is great, And Venus who brings every thing that's fair ! Thek.
Page 94 - Give me, next good, an understanding wife, By Nature wise, not learned by much art; Some knowledge on her side will all my life More scope of conversation impart; Besides, her inborne virtue fortifie; They are most firmly good, who best know why.
Page 345 - Like a broad table did itselfe dispred, For Love his loftie triumphes to engrave, And write the battailes of his great godhed: All good and honour might therein be red ; For there their dwelling was.
Page 78 - I have seen), which notwithstanding, as it is full of stately speeches and well-sounding phrases, climbing to the height of Seneca his style, and as full of notable morality, which it doth most delightfully teach, and so obtain the very end of poesy...
Page 213 - That not to know at large of things remote From use, obscure and subtle, but to know That which before us lies in daily life, Is the prime wisdom ; what is more, is fume, Or emptiness, or fond impertinence, And renders us, in things that most concern, Unpractised, unprepared, and still to seek.

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