The works of Christopher Marlowe: with notes and some account of his life and writings, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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William Pickering, 1850
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Page 98 - Their minds, and muses on admired themes; If all the heavenly quintessence they still From their immortal flowers of poesy, Wherein, as in a mirror, we perceive The highest reaches of a human wit; If these had made one poem's period, And all combin'd in beauty's worthiness, Yet should there hover in their restless heads One thought, one grace, one wonder, at the least, Which into words no virtue can digest.
Page 50 - Our souls, whose faculties can comprehend The wondrous architecture of the world, And measure every wandering planet's course, Still climbing after knowledge infinite, And always moving as the restless spheres. Will us to wear ourselves, and never rest, Until we reach the ripest fruit of all, That perfect bliss and sole felicity, The sweet fruition of an earthly crown.
Page 347 - But now begins the extremity of heat To pinch me with intolerable pangs : Die, life ! fly, soul ! tongue, curse thy fill, and die ! [Dies.
Page 98 - If all the pens that ever poets held Had fed the feeling of their masters' thoughts, And every sweetness that inspired their hearts, Their minds, and muses on admired themes ; If all the heavenly quintessence they still From their immortal flowers of poesy, Wherein, as in a mirror, we perceive The highest reaches of a human wit ; If these had made one poem's period, And all combined in...
Page 237 - tis to count this trash ! Well fare the Arabians, who so richly pay The things they traffic for with wedge of gold, Whereof a man may easily in a day Tell that which may maintain him all his life. The needy groom, that never finger'd groat, Would make a miracle of thus much coin ; But he whose steel-barr'd coffers are cramm'd full, And all his life-time hath been tired, Wearying his fingers...
Page 211 - Well, soldiers, Mahomet remains in hell ; He cannot hear the voice of Tamburlaine ; Seek out another Godhead to adore, The God that sits in heaven, if any God ; For he is God alone, and none but he. Re-enter Techelles. Tech. I have fulfilled your highness
Page xxx - With neither of them that take offence was I acquainted, and with one of them I care not if I never be...
Page 276 - As for myself, I walk abroad a-nights, And kill sick people groaning under walls : Sometimes I go about, and poison wells; And now and then, to cherish Christian thieves, I am content to lose some of my crowns, That I may, walking in my gallery, See 'm go pinioned along by my door.
Page 264 - ... Tis not so happy : yet, when we parted last, He said he would attend me in the morn. Then, gentle Sleep, where'er his body rests, Give charge to Morpheus that he may dream A golden dream, and of the sudden wake, Come and receive the treasure I have found.
Page 9 - From jigging veins of rhyming mother wits, And such conceits as clownage keeps in pay, We'll lead you to the stately tent of War, Where you shall hear the Scythian Tamburlaine Threat'ning the world with high astounding terms And scourging kingdoms with his conquering sword.

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