The House on the Strand

Front Cover
Buccaneer Books, 1993 - Fiction - 308 pages
1 Review
Forever fit through Triathlon and Movement is Life -Life is Movement. These mottos are of particular importance for the group of people who count as masters in international sport circles i.e. those who have already turned forty and therefore have a different sports profile to the 20-year olds. The Master Handbook accompanies all triathletes -beginners and advanced alike -in their bid to success in sport. Detailed instructions and realistic training plans both for triathletes who still go out to work and for those who have retired are the central theme of this work. All triathletes who wish to be successful are provided with the necessary advice for swimming, cycling and running training as well for triathlon competitions. Further tips and advice complete this book, for example, fitness for masters, pulse measurement, achieving one's goal despite performance limits, regeneration, equipment, nutrition, stretching not to mention numerous anecdotes from training and competition.#

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Review: The House on the Strand

User Review  - Sammie - Goodreads

I really enjoyed this book. Richard is convinced to try a drug his professor friend has concocted, and is amazed when it appears to transport his mind temporarily back in time. The experience is ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
6
Section 3
11
Copyright

21 other sections not shown

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About the author (1993)

Daphne Du Maurier was born in London on May 13, 1907 and educated in Paris. In 1932, she married Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Browning. She began writing short stories of mystery and suspense for magazines in 1928, a collection of which appeared as The Apple Tree in 1952. Her first novel, The Loving Spirit, was published in 1931. Her tightly woven, highly suspenseful plots and her strong characters make her stories perfect for adaptation to film or television. Among her many novels that were made into successful films are Jamaica Inn (1936), Rebecca (1938), Frenchman's Creek (1941), Hungry Hill (1943), My Cousin Rachel (1952), and The Scapegoat (1957). Her short story, The Birds (1953), was brought to the screen by director Alfred Hitchcock in a treatment that has become a classic horror-suspense film. She died on April 19, 1989 at the age of 81.

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