WANDERINGS IN THE GREAT FORESTS OF BORNEO TRAVELS AND RESEARCHES OF A NATURALIST IN SARAWAK (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1904
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 389 - Rafflesia is now so very different from the other forms of the vegetable world, the transitional types, according to the theory of slow and gradual evolution, ought to have been infinite. It thus appears very extraordinary that none of those extremely numerous intermediate types should have survived. May it not be that the Rafflesia, and a host of other aberrant species, both animals and plants, are examples of the autocreation of organisms (derived from exceptional circumstances of the environment)...
Page 166 - Mayas fell to the ground nearly at my feet. Immediately after, a second one, of much larger size, appeared, and climbed up the very same tree. It was soon hidden amongst the branches, and although I fired twice when I caught glimpses of the creature, yet both shots missed. Presently we saw him higher up on a big branch, looking down at us. This time my bullet took effect, and the animal fell, mortally wounded.
Page 168 - I stood, and only aboxt fifteen feet from the ground. It was moving rapidly, catching the branches in front with one hand as it let go behind those it held with the foot, and alternating thus with hands and feet. The jungle was young and very thick, with dense underwood, so that when I had finished reloading my gun both orangs had disappeared, even the first one, which I felt sure I had hit. But " Kap," a small dog I had with me, had followed the latter, and enabled me to come up with it.
Page 21 - ST. JOHN. Life in the Forests of the Far East, I., p.
Page 337 - It certainly was not eaten to appease hunger, but as a delicacy or perhaps to assuage an instinctive craving of the stomach for some alkaline substance." Walker (21, p. 220) writes: "I made the discovery that some of my Dyak friends were addicted to the horrible habit of eating clay, and actually found a regular little digging in the side of a hill where they worked to get these lumps of reddish grey clay, and soon caught some of the old men eating...
Page 10 - ... itself to the passer-by on the slightest contact, getting especially on the hands and neck ; the other, which is still more frequent, lives on the ground, and gets on the feet and legs. There is no way of avoiding them ; they get into the shoes and under the stockings, and, fastening especially round the ankle, gorge themselves with blood before one is aware of their unwelcome presence.
Page 407 - Of this kind are the glands which are on the inner part of the lid of the pitcher, where if a greedy and imprudent insect tries to rest, it is almost certain to be trapped. But where Nature has shown all her refinement of perfidy is in the disposal of these baits within and around the rim of the pitchers. All the ornamental appendages, grooves, enlargements, rings, points...
Page 168 - I caught sight of the first quite near on a small tree. I fired twice, but did not succeed in killing it. As I was reloading, the second Mayas suddenly appeared, not twenty paces from where I stood, and only about fifteen feet from the ground. It was moving rapidly, catching the branches in front with one hand as it let go behind those it held with the foot, and alternating thus with hands and feet. The jungle was young and very thick, with dense underwood, so that when I had finished reloading my...

Bibliographic information