The Devil's Larder: A Feast

Front Cover
Macmillan, Sep 7, 2002 - Fiction - 176 pages
24 Reviews
A sumptuous, scintillating stew of sixty four short fictions about appetite, food, and the objects of our desire

All great meals, it has been said, lead to discussions of either sex or death, and The Devil's Larder, in typical Cracean fashion, leads to both. Here are sixty four short fictions of at times Joycean beauty--about schoolgirls hunting for razor clams in the strand; or searching for soup-stones to take out the fishiness of fish but to preserve the flavor of the sea; or about a mother and daughter tasting food in one another's mouth to see if people really do taste things differently--and at other times, of Mephistophelean mischief: about the woman who seasoned her food with the remains of her cremated cat, and later, her husband, only to hear a voice singing from her stomach (you can't swallow grief, she was advised); or the restaurant known as "The Air & Light," the place to be in this small coastal town that serves as the backdrop for Crace's gastronomic flights of fancy, but where no food or beverage is actually served, though a 12 percent surcharge is imposed just for just sitting there and being seen.

Food for thought in the best sense of the term, The Devil's Larder is another delectable work of fiction by a 2001 winner of The National Book Critics Circle Award.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
9
4 stars
9
3 stars
4
2 stars
1
1 star
1

Review: The Devil's Larder

User Review  - Matt - Goodreads

My friend Pete this early (2001) entry in the "collections of short, otherwise disconnected pieces organized around a theme" genre (think You're an Animal, Viscowitz, or Scorch Atlas or Cataclysm Baby ... Read full review

Review: The Devil's Larder

User Review  - Amanda - Goodreads

I found this in my Nook library and couldn't remember reading it! I started re-reading it, and the stories came back to me, only then did I remember them vividly. It's a nice beach read. Read full review

Contents

I
4
II
4
III
6
IV
9
V
10
VI
13
VII
14
VIII
18
XXXIII
XXXIV
XXXV
XXXVI
XXXVII
XXXVIII
XXXIX
XL

IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
XIV
XVI
XVII
XVIII
XIX
XX
XXI
XXII
XXIII
XXIV
XXV
XXVI
XXVII
XXVIII
XXIX
XXX
XXXI
XXXII
XLI
XLII
XLIII
XLIV
XLV
XLVI
XLVII
XLVIII
XLIX
L
LI
LII
LIII
LIV
LV
LVI
LVII
LVIII
LIX
LX
LXI
LXII
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2002)

Jim Crace is the author, most recently, of Quarantine, which won the 1997 Whitbread Novel of the Year Award and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize, and Being Dead, which was the winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction in 2000. His novels have been translated into fourteen languages. He lives in Birmingham, England.

Bibliographic information