Web-based Instruction: A Guide for Libraries

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American Library Association, Jan 1, 2001 - Computers - 194 pages
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As library users and students are becoming increasingly tech-savvy, it is important that librarians are at the ready with the skills they need to offer online instruction. Academic librarians in particular, who are responsible for developing the research skills of the students they serve, should benefit from being able to go beyond traditional classroom instruction which often falls short when training users to navigate complex databases and varied interfaces. Susan Smith is a proponent of using technology to take library educational services to the next level. Following her approach, the reader should be equipped to: evaluate, test, and refine programmes on an ongoing basis; determine what makes an effective Web-based instruction programme; serve a large number of students with 24/7 access to interactive, self-paced, and self-directed instruction; and select appropriate hardware, software, and levels of interactivity.

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Review: Web-Based Instruction

User Review  - Linda - Goodreads

Fabulous book! I highly recomend to any librarian embarking on a web project. The concepts & principles covered are applicable to most types of web resource development. Read full review

Contents

Library Instruction on the Web
5
Design and Development Cycle
15
Selecting Project Development Tools
28
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

Susan Sharpless Smith is the Director of Research, Instruction and Technology Services for Z. Smith Reynolds Library, Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, NC. Her long term interests have been exploring the potential the Web offers for the provision of library services and instruction. She received the 2008 ACRL IS Innovation Award for her work as an embedded librarian in a two week sociology course that traveled by bus through the Deep South. Smith received a master s degree in Library and Information Studies from University of North Carolina-Greensboro and a master s degree in Educational Technology Leadership from George Washington University.

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