The grass dancer

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Berkley Books, Aug 1, 1995 - Fiction - 352 pages
24 Reviews
Back in the 1860s, Ghost Horse, a handsome young heyo'ka, or sacred clown, loved and lost the beautiful warrior woman Red Dress. Since then, their spirits have sought desperately to be reunited, and it is the ceaseless playing out of this drama that shapes the sometimes violent fate of those who have come after them.

Now, in the 1980s, Charlene Thunder, a teenage descendant of Red Dress, is in love with Harley Wind Soldier, the dashing traditional dancer of Ghost Horse's lineage. When Harley's redheaded soul mate, Pumpkin, dies in a crash, Charlene guiltily suspects her own grandmother, the notorious witch Anna Thunder, of causing it - as she well may have caused the collision that claimed Harley's father and brother, which even today obsesses him.

Charlene and Harley each strive in solitude to make peace with the ghosts of the old ways, while they contend with the living: Jeannette McVay, an eastern college student who is studying the tribe; Crystal Thunder, who must escape the reservation in order to understand her past; Herod Small War, whose spiritual guidance is both revered and resented; Margaret Many Wounds, Harley's grandmother, who walks on the moon.

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Bad book. Do not read it

Review: The Grass Dancer

User Review  - John Mccullough - Goodreads

This was a wonderful view of life in a contemporary Native American community, seen from the perspective of several people. I read it years ago but still remember it as a good introduction to life today. Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
11
Section 3
57
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (1995)

Susan Power is an enrolled member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe. Her short fiction has appeared in The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Prairie Schooner, High Plains Literary Review, and Story. A chapter from The Grass Dancer, her first novel, was selected for The Best American Short Stories 1993.