Life of Daniel Webster, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Appleton, 1870 - 1318 pages
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Page 170 - Sir, you may destroy this little institution ; it is weak; it is in your hands ! I know it is one of the lesser lights in the literary horizon of our country. You may put it out. But, if you do so, you must carry through your work! You must extinguish, one after another, all those greater lights of science which, for more than a century, have thrown their radiance over our land!
Page 478 - He never stooped to the arena of partisan discussions, but in the consideration of important subjects, especially that of the removal of the public deposits from the Bank of the United States, he proved himself to be a statesman of high rank, and a most accomplished debater.
Page 98 - France and their dependencies, and for other purposes," that '!in case either France or Great Britain shall so revoke or modify her edicts as that they shall cease to violate the neutral commerce of the United States...
Page 340 - To-day we have had the inauguration. A monstrous crowd of people is in the city. I never saw anything like it before. Persons have come five hundred miles to see General Jackson, and they really seem to think that the country is rescued from some frightful danger.
Page 170 - ... mastery over himself which might save him from an unmanly burst of feeling. I will not attempt to give you the few broken words of tenderness in which he went on to speak of his attachment to the college.
Page 450 - ... 3. That there is a supreme law, consisting of the constitution of the United States, acts of Congress passed in pursuance of it, and treaties; and that, in cases not capable of assuming the character of a suit in law or equity, Congress must judge of, and finally interpret, this supreme law...
Page 230 - I should have set before thine eyes The road to Heaven, and showed it clear ; But thou untaught springs't to the skies, And leav'st thy teacher lingering here. Sweet Seraph, I would learn of thee, And hasten to partake thy bliss ! And oh ! to thy world welcome me, As first I welcomed thee to this.
Page 194 - This oration will be read five hundred years hence with as much rapture as it was heard. It ought to be read at the end of every century, and indeed at the end of every year, forever and ever.
Page 421 - The opportunities which you have derived from a participation in our public councils, as well as other sources of information, will enable you to speak with confidence, (as far as you may deem it proper and useful so to do), of the respective parts taken by those to whom the administration of this government is now committed, in relation to the course heretofore pursued upon the subject of the colonial trade.
Page 159 - But seeing that such a power is not expressly given by the Constitution, and believing that it can not be deduced from any part of it without an inadmissible latitude of construction and a reliance on insufficient precedents; believing also that the permanent success of the Constitution depends on a definite partition of powers...

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