Reading the Gospels Wisely: A Narrative and Theological Introduction

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Baker Academic, 2012 - Religion - 268 pages
16 Reviews
In this work, Jonathan Pennington examines the theological and ethical aims of the Gospel narratives, helping students see the fruit of historical and literary study. He contends that we can learn to read the Gospels well from various vantage points, including those of premodern, modern, and postmodern habits and postures. This textbook can stand on its own as a guide to reading the Gospels as Scripture. It is also ideally suited to supplement conventional textbooks that discuss each Gospel systematically. Most textbooks tend to introduce students to historical-critical concerns but may be less adequate for showing how the Gospel narratives, read as Scripture within the canonical framework of the entire New Testament and the whole Bible, yield material for theological reflection and faithful practice. Pennington neither dismisses nor duplicates the results of current historical-critical work on the Gospels as historical sources. Rather, he offers critically aware and hermeneutically intelligent instruction in reading the Gospels in order to hear their witness to Christ in a way that supports Christian application and proclamation. This text will appeal to professors and students in Gospels, New Testament survey, and New Testament interpretation courses. - Publisher.

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Review: Reading the Gospels Wisely: A Narrative And Theological Introduction

User Review  - Marcus Privitt - Goodreads

I'm a seminary student and this was required for reading for class. Although I see other reviews noting the "density" of the reading and it being a bit more academic - I assure you, if you're used to ... Read full review

Review: Reading the Gospels Wisely: A Narrative And Theological Introduction

User Review  - Joel Wentz - Goodreads

This book strikes a helpful balance on the "academic - popular" spectrum. The first (of three) units is the lengthiest and most dense, but does effectively build a foundation for the more practical ... Read full review

About the author (2012)

Jonathan T. Pennington (PhD, University of St. Andrews) is associate professor of New Testament interpretation at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. He is the author of Heaven and Earth in the Gospel of Matthew and has published a number of tools for learning biblical languages, including New Testament Greek Vocabulary and Old Testament Hebrew Vocabulary.

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