Notes on the Cuff & Other Stories

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Ardis, 1991 - Fiction - 223 pages
3 Reviews
The stories collected here represent a sampling of the prose that first established Bulgakov as a major figure in the literary renaissance of Moscow in the 1920s, long before he became known as an influential playwright and novelist. The centerpiece of this collection is the long story "Notes on the Cuff", a comically autobiographical account of how the tenacious young writer managed to begin his literary career despite famine, typhus, civil war, the wrong political affiliation, and the Byzantine Moscow bureaucracy. This stylistically brilliant work was only partially published during Bulgakov's lifetime due to censorship, but was immediately recognized by the literati as an important work. The other stories collected here range from a sequence about the Civil War to Bulgakov's early reportage on the rebuilding of Moscow in the early 1920s, stories which now have a strikingly contemporary ring. Bulgakov describes the swindlers who arrived along with NEP, a program for the limited return to a market economy, as well as the vast reconstruction as the city is brought back from the destruction of civil war. Bulgakov, who burst on the world literary scene in the 1960s with the publication of his long-suppressed The Master and Margarita, has continued to enjoy tremendous success both in and out of Russia where productions of his plays and adaptations of his prose works have found new audiences.

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Review: Notes on the Cuff and Other Stories

User Review  - Emily - Goodreads

Feuilletons I'd imagine of chiefly historical interest, but two stories of real quality--showed Bulgakov's gift for whatever it is. Magical realism? Hyperrealism? Black comedy? Worth reading for those two longer works. Read full review

Review: Notes on the Cuff and Other Stories

User Review  - TP Williams - Goodreads

Some short stories and "feuilletons" by the Russian author, who I understand is quite influential (I had not read anything by him before picking this one up on the discount pile at a bookstore). I ... Read full review

Contents

Red Stone Moscow
121
The Capital in a Notebook
129
Moscow City of Churches
155
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (1991)

Mikhail Afanasevich Bulgakov was a Russian playwright, novelist, and short-story writer best known for his use of humor and satire. He was born in Kiev, Ukraine, on May 15, 1891, and graduated from the Medical School of Kiev University in 1916. He served as a field doctor during World War I. Bulgakov's association with the Moscow Art Theater began in 1926 with the production of his play The Days of the Turbins, which was based on his novel The White Guard. His work was popular, but since it ridiculed the Soviet establishment, was frequently censored. His satiric novel The Heart of a Dog was not published openly in the U.S.S.R. until 1987. Bulgakov's plays including Pushkin and Moliere dealt with artistic freedom. His last novel, The Master and Margarita, was not published until 1966-67 and in censored form. Bulgakov died in Moscow on March 10, 1940.

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