Another Essence of Malone, Or, The "Beauties" of Shakespeare's Editor (Google eBook)

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T. Becket, 1801 - 313 pages
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Page 103 - M. William Shak-speare : HIS True Chronicle Historic of the life and death of King LEAR and his three Daughters.
Page 54 - And the first went, and poured out his vial upon the earth; and there fell a noisome and grievous sore upon the men which had the mark of the beast, and upon them which worshipped his image.
Page 130 - ... from contemporary authors, and to form a genuine text by a faithful collation of the original copies, has not perhaps had that notice to which it is entitled; for undoubtedly it is a laborious and a difficult task: and the due execution of this it is, which can alone entitle an editor of Shakspeare to the favour of the publick.
Page 15 - As I foretold you, were all fpirits, and Are melted into air, into thin air ; And, like the bafelefs fabric of this vifion, The cloud-capt towers, the gorgeous palaces, The folemn temples, the great globe itfelf, Yea, all which it inherit, fhall diffolve ; And, like this infubftantial pageant faded, Leave not a rack behind ! We are fuch fluff As dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a Deep.
Page 123 - ... or to compare in his thoughts a length of a thousand diameters of the earth, with that of a million, and he will quickly find that he has no different measures in his mind adjusted to such extraordinary degrees of grandeur or minuteness.
Page 40 - Hobgoblin call you, and sweet Puck, You do their work, and they shall have good luck : Are not you he ? Puck.
Page 17 - Faith, gentlemen, it is so long since I wrote the line, I have forgot my meaning. This I know, could I have dreamt so much nonsense would have been talked and writ about it, I would have blotted it out of my works ; for I am sure, if any of these be my meaning, it doth me very little honour.
Page 32 - I fhould hate myfelf for patiently enduring to he a lord. This is ill enough exprefled. Perhaps fome happy change may fet it right. I have tried, and can do nothing, yet I cannot heartily concur with Dr. Warburton. JOHNSON.
Page 34 - I had no wit [or discretion] in my anger, but was absurd enough to wish myself one of that set of men, whom I despise. He then exclaims with indignation — To be a lord...

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