The History of Philippine Civilization as Reflected in Religious Nomenclature, Volume 19 (Google eBook)

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The Trustees, 1918 - Ethnology - 33 pages
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Page 84 - ... the non-differentiation of the sexes. These features reveal Filipino society as simple and "natural" in character; that is, close to its biological substratum, and comparatively free from the purely social creations or elaborations that tend to flourish in many other parts of the world. The kinship schemes accord well with these institutions. The equality of the sexes is reflected in the paucity of the sex-limited terms of relationship and in the total absence of any terms implying the sex of...
Page 84 - Institutions probably shape terminologies causally, but in the main by influencing or permitting a logical scheme. In a sense this logical scheme underlies both institution and terminology, so that the correlation between them, although actual, can be conceived as indirect.
Page 41 - It is clear from this table that: (1) The Igorot group is sharply marked off from all other peoples on the islands. Practically all the terms shared by any Igorot tribe with any other tribe are shared with other Igorot tribes, and with them only. (2) All the other groups do not fall into well defined classes. All seem to possess certain elements in common; the degree to which they share or fail to share these with each other is proportionate to their distances from each other.
Page 61 - Igorot religion; and as to the Cagayan nation proper, there is no information. It is therefore not unlikely that the combined area of the Ilokano and Cagayan speech groups will prove to be almost the same as the area of religious specialization characterized as "Igorot" in the foregoing pages. In short, then, the evidence of language does not correlate well with that of racial type, but does partly correlate with the findings made in the field of religion in the present paper. CULTURE. The culture...
Page 67 - ... islands. The hope that a resolution of this civilization into several obviously separable and still distinct culture strata may be feasible, promises to be equally illusory. Deeper understanding will be attained only through the historical method of painstaking and penetrating analysis, with reintegration deferred until the segregation of cultures and cultural influences into their elements shall have progressed much farther. For this indispensable analysis the ethnological method of intensive...
Page 80 - ... and Wife: asawa is the commonest term. It seems always to have the generic meaning of spouse. Step-relatives. Tagalog calls step-parents uncle or aunt. Magindanao similarly uses its uncle-father term bapa for stepfather. In other languages data are lacking. Malay adds tiri precisely as we prepose "step-.
Page 81 - ... sibling; possibly ari. 6, probably a generic term for sibling, though this, unless it is ari, is scarcely recoverable from the Philippine data alone. The concept, like the words, may be secondary; but its wide prevalence indicates antiquity. 7, apo, possibly nono as alternative, self-reciprocal for grandparents and grandchildren. 8, possibly bapa for paternal and maternal uncle, father-in-law, stepfather, that is males of the father's generation generically, not excluding the father himself.
Page 81 - ... Philippine data alone. The concept, like the words, may be secondary; but its wide prevalence indicates antiquity. 7, apo, possibly nono as alternative, self-reciprocal for grandparents and grandchildren. 8, possibly bapa for paternal and maternal uncle, father-in-law, stepfather, that is males of the father's generation generically, not excluding the father himself. 9, possibly a corresponding term for females of the mother's generation. 10, 11, one or two terms for brother-in-law and sister-in-law....
Page 41 - By expressing, in figures and tables, the terms shared by these groups he determines that: (1) The Igorot group is sharply marked off from all other peoples on the islands. Practically all the terms shared by any Igorot tribe with any other tribe are shared with other Igorot tribes; and with them only. (2) All the other groups do not fall into well-defined classes. All seem to possess certain elements in common ; the degree to which they share or fail to share these with each other is proportionate...
Page 75 - Swettenham, Vocabulary of the English and Malay Languages. London, 1901. The Nabaloi, Kankanai, Bontok, and Ifugao are Igorot that is, members of the great block of pagan mountaineers in northern Luzon, a people somewhat distinct racially from the lowlanders, and less affected than any other, except perhaps a few small parasitic tribes, by Indian, Arab, or European influences. The Subanun are pagans in Mindanao, dominated by Mohammedan neighbors, but distinctly backward cul75 turally.

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