The Second Stage: With a New Introduction

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Harvard University Press, 1981 - Social Science - 357 pages
2 Reviews

First published in 1981, The Second Stage is eerily prescient and timely, a reminder that much of what is called new thinking in feminism has been eloquently observed and argued before. Warning the women's movement against dissolving into factionalism, male-bashing, and preoccupation with sexual and identity politics rather than bottom-line political and economic inequalities, Friedan argues that once past the initial phases of describing and working against political and economic injustices, the women's movement should focus on working with men to remake private and public arrangements that work against full lives with children for women and men both. Friedan's agenda to preserve families is far more radical than it appears, for she argues that a truly equitable preservation of marriage and family may require a reorganization of many aspects of conventional middle-class life, from the greater use of flex time and job-sharing, to company-sponsored daycare, to new home designs to permit communal housekeeping and cooking arrangements.

Called "utopian" fifteen years ago, when it seemed unbelievable that women had enough power in the workplace to make effective demands, or that men would join them, some of these visions are slowly but steadily coming to pass even now. The problem Friedan identifies is as real now as it was years ago: "how to live the equality we fought for," and continue to fight for, with "the family as new feminist frontier." She writes not only for women's liberation but for human liberation.

  

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Review: The Second Stage: With a New Introduction

User Review  - Desert - Goodreads

This is what is need now and probably then too. Lucklly those crazy hippy moms raised boys who weren't limted by being men Read full review

Contents

END OF THE BEGINNING
3
The HalfLife of Reaction
31
The Family as New Feminist Frontier
70
The Quiet Movement of American Men
112
Reality Test at West Point
150
The Limits and True Potential
189
The New Mode
226
Take Back the Day
245
The House and the Dream
270
Human Sex and Human Politics
298
How to Get
334
Copyright

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About the author (1981)

Betty Friedan was born Betty Naomi Goldstein on February 4, 1921 in Peoria, Illinois. The future feminist leader experienced anti-semitism growing up; this undoubtedly contributed to her political activism later in life. Graduating from Smith College in Massachusetts with a degree in psychology, she began her career as a reporter in New York City, and a few years later married Carl Friedan. The beginning of the women's movement in the United States can be traced to the publication of Friedan's first book, The Feminist Mystique, in 1963; it was instantly successful. Friedan wrote a follow-up to this book almost 20 years later, The Second Stage, in which she outlined issues that still needed addressing by feminists. She has also written a semi-autobiographical work, It Changed My Life, and a book about aging and society called The Fountain of Age. Friedan was a co-founder and the first president of the National Organization for Women. She has taught at New York University and the University of Southern California.

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