Economist with a Public Purpose: Essays in Honour of John Kenneth Galbraith

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John Kenneth Galbraith, Michael Keaney
Routledge, Jan 1, 2001 - Business & Economics - 274 pages
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Galbraith's arguments are discussed by a group of economists in regards to current controversies and problems. Topics covered range from globalization and the role of the state to redistributive economic policies. The result is a collection that pays tribute to one of the most prominent, and yet still contemporarily relevant, economists of the twentieth century.

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About the author (2001)

John Kenneth Galbraith is a Canadian-born American economist who is perhaps the most widely read economist in the world. He taught at Harvard from 1934-1939 and then again from 1949-1975. An adviser to President John F. Kennedy, he served from 1961 to 1963 as U.S. ambassador to India. His style and wit in writing and his frequent media appearances have contributed greatly to his fame as an economist. Galbraith believes that it is not sufficient for government to manage the level of effective demand; government must manage the market itself. Galbraith stated in American Capitalism (1952) that the market is far from competitive, and governments and labor unions must serve as "countervailing power." He believes that ultimately "producer sovereignty" takes the place of consumer sovereignty and the producer - not the consumer - becomes ruler of the marketplace.

Michael Keaney is a lecturer in economics at Glasgow Caledonian -University.

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