Treasure Island (Google eBook)

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
1 Review
One of the most loved adventure stories of all time, "Treasure Island" is the swashbuckling tale of the search for hidden treasure. When an old sea captain by the name of Billy Bones dies at the inn of Jim Hawkins' parents, Jim and his mother discover a treasure map among his belongings. Jim shows the map to some local acquaintances, Dr. Livesey and Squire Trelawney and together they plan an expedition to find the treasure. Together they set sail aboard the Hispaniola led by a Captain Smollett in search of Treasure Island.
  

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One of my favorite books by Robert Louis Stevenson. A great and inspirational tale that influenced the world of literature forever.

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Contents

PART ONE The Old Buccaneer 1 THE OLD SEADOG AT THE ADMIRAL BENBOW p
7
BLACK DOG APPEARS AND DISAPPEARS p
10
THE BLACK SPOT p
13
THE SEACHEST p
16
THE LAST OF THE BLIND MAN p
20
THE CAPTAINS PAPERS p
22
PART TWO The Sea Cook 7 I GO TO BRISTOL p
26
AT THE SIGN OF THE SPYGLASS p
29
NARRATIVE RESUMED BY JIM HAWKINS THE GARRISON IN THE STOCKADE p
60
SILVERS EMBASSY p
63
THE ATTACK p
66
PART FIVE My Sea Adventure 22 HOW MY SEA ADVENTURE BEGAN p
70
THE EBBTIDE RUNS p
73
THE CRUISE OF THE CORACLE p
75
STRIKE THE JOLLY ROGER p
78
ISRAEL HANDS p
81

POWDER AND ARMS p
32
THE VOYAGE p
35
WHAT I HEARD IN THE APPLE BARREL p
38
COUNCIL OF WAR p
41
PART THREE My Shore Adventure 13 HOW MY SHORE ADVENTURE BEGAN p
44
THE FIRST BLOW p
46
THE MAN OF THE ISLAND p
49
PART FOUR The Stockade 16 NARRATIVE CONTINUED BY THE DOCTOR HOW THE SHIP WAS ABANDONED p
53
THE JOLLYBOATS LAST TRIP p
55
END OF THE FIRST DAYS FIGHTING p
58
PIECES OF EIGHT p
85
PART SIX Captain Silver 28 IN THE ENEMYS CAMP p
89
THE BLACK SPOT AGAIN p
93
ON PAROLE p
96
THE TREASUREHUNTFLINTS POINTER p
100
THE TREASUREHUNTTHE VOICE AMONG THE TREES p
104
THE FALL OF A CHIEFTAIN p
107
AND LAST p
110
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Page 9 - ... that if you keep on drinking rum, the world will soon be quit of a very dirty scoundrel!" The old fellow's fury was awful. He sprang to his feet, drew and opened a sailor's clasp-knife, and, balancing it open on the palm of his hand, threatened to pin the doctor to the wall. The doctor never so much as moved. He spoke to him, as before, over his shoulder, and in the same tone of voice; rather high, so that all...
Page 6 - I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow; a tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man; his tarry pigtail falling over the shoulders of his soiled blue coat; his hands ragged and scarred, with black, broken nails; and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid white.
Page 2 - If sailor tales to sailor tunes, Storm and adventure, heat and cold, If schooners, islands, and maroons, And buccaneers, and buried gold, And all the old romance, retold Exactly in the ancient way, Can please, as me they pleased of old, The wiser youngsters of today: So be it, and fall on!

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About the author (2004)

Novelist, poet, and essayist Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. A sickly child, Stevenson was an invalid for part of his childhood and remained in ill health throughout his life. He began studying engineering at Edinburgh University but soon switched to law. His true inclination, however, was for writing. For several years after completing his studies, Stevenson traveled on the Continent, gathering ideas for his writing. His Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey (1878) describe some of his experiences there. A variety of essays and short stories followed, most of which were published in magazines. It was with the publication of Treasure Island in 1883, however, that Stevenson achieved wide recognition and fame. This was followed by his most successful adventure story, Kidnapped, which appeared in 1886. With stories such as Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Stevenson revived Daniel Defoe's novel of romantic adventure, adding to it psychological analysis. While these stories and others, such as David Balfour and The Master of Ballantrae (1889), are stories of adventure, they are at the same time fine studies of character. The Master of Ballantrae, in particular, is a study of evil character, and this study is taken even further in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). In 1887 Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, went to the United States, first to the health spas of Saranac Lake, New York, and then on to the West Coast. From there they set out for the South Seas in 1889. Except for one trip to Sidney, Australia, Stevenson spent the remainder of his life on the island of Samoa with his devoted wife and stepson. While there he wrote The Wrecker (1892), Island Nights Entertainments (1893), and Catriona (1893), a sequel to Kidnapped. He also worked on St. Ives and The Weir of Hermiston, which many consider to be his masterpiece. He died suddenly of apoplexy, leaving both of these works unfinished. Both were published posthumously; St. Ives was completed by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, and The Weir of Hermiston was published unfinished. Stevenson was buried on Samoa, an island he had come to love very much. Although Stevenson's novels are perhaps more accomplished, his short stories are also vivid and memorable. All show his power of invention, his command of the macabre and the eerie, and the psychological depth of his characterization.

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