Life and Teachings of Confucius (Google eBook)

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Page 50 - For there is not a just man upon earth, that doeth good, and sinneth not.
Page 266 - States, they first regulated their families. Wishing to regulate their families, they first cultivated their persons. Wishing to cultivate their persons, they first rectified their hearts. Wishing to rectify their hearts, they first sought to be sincere in their thoughts. Wishing to be sincere in their thoughts, they first extended to the utmost their knowledge. Such extension of knowledge lay in the investigation of things.
Page 53 - Therefore his fame overspreads the Middle kingdom, and extends to all barbarous tribes. Wherever ships and carriages reach ; wherever the strength of man penetrates; wherever the heavens, overshadow and. the earth sustains ; wherever the sun and moon shine ; wherever frosts and dews fall : — all who have blood and breath unfeignedly honour and love him. Hence it is said, —
Page 44 - While there are no stirrings of pleasure, anger, sorrow, or joy, the mind may be said to be in the state of Equilibrium. When those feelings have been stirred, and they act in their due degree, there ensues what may be called the state of Harmony. This Equilibrium is the great root from which grow all the human actings in the world, and this Harmony is the universal path which they all should pursue. Let the states of equilibrium and harmony exist in perfection, and a happy order will prevail throughout...
Page 153 - A transmitter and not a maker, believing in and loving the ancients, I venture to compare myself with our old P'ang.
Page 141 - When one cultivates to the utmost the principles of his nature, and exercises them on the principle of reciprocity, he is not far from the path. What you do not like when done to yourself, do not do to others.
Page 101 - He sacrificed to the dead, as if they were present. He sacrificed to the spirits, as if the spirits were present. 2. The Master said, " I consider my not being present at the sacrifice, as if I did not sacrifice.
Page 125 - Learning without thought is labour lost ; thought without learning is perilous." XVI. The Master said, " The study of strange doctrines is injurious indeed ! " XVII. The Master said, " Yew, shall I teach you what knowledge is ? When you know a thing, to hold that you know it; and when you do not know a thing, to allow that you do not know it; — this is knowledge.
Page 32 - Therefore, the superior man must be watchful over himself when he is alone. 2. There is no evil to which the mean man, dwelling retired, will not proceed, but when 'he sees a superior man he instantly tries to disguise himself, concealing his evil, and displaying what is good. The other beholds him, as if he saw his heart and...
Page 192 - Chung-kung asked about perfect virtue. The Master said, 'It is, when you go abroad, to behave to every one as if you were receiving a great guest; to employ the people as if you were assisting at a great sacrifice; not to do to others as you would not wish done to yourself; to have no murmuring against you in the country, and none in the family.

References from web pages

JSTOR: The Chinese Classics.
The Chinese Classics. By JAMES LEGGE,Re- printed with minor corrections and an added concordance. Five Volumes. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 1960. ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0021-9118(196302)22%3A2%3C202%3ATCC%3E2.0.CO%3B2-7

The Chinese Classics by James Legge - Free ebook
The Chinese Classics. Subtitle Prolegomena. Author James Legge. Category Classic. Language English. Notes. [unicode]. Approx. 56661 words. Excerpt ...
manybooks.net/ titles/ leggejametext02lggpr10u.html

Project Gutenberg Edition of The Chinese Classics: Confucian ...
The Chinese Classics: Confucian Analects (in Chinese and English). by Confucius. translated by James Legge · Project Gutenberg Release #4094 (May 2003) ...
digital.library.upenn.edu/ webbin/ gutbook/ lookup?num=4094

'THE CHINESE CLASSICS.'
'THE CHINESE CLASSICS.' T. HESE TWO VOLUMES, of each of which 1200 Copies were printed at Hongkong. in 1861, being now very nearly out of print, ...
sunzi1.lib.hku.hk/ hkjo/ view/ 26/ 2601788.pdf

The Chinese Classics — Volume 1: Confucian Analects by James ...
Download the free ebook: The Chinese Classics — Volume 1: Confucian Analects by James Legge.
www.gutenberg.org/ etext/ 4094

Confucian Documents
The Chinese Classics. These are key texts of Confucianism, the traditional state religion of feudal China. These are some of the few Chinese texts which ...
www.sacred-texts.com/ cfu/ index.htm

Internet Archive Search: creator:"Legge, James, 1815-1897"
Book from Project Gutenberg: The Chinese Classics - Volume 1: Confucian ... The prologomena to the Chinese classics of Confucius and Mencius - Legge, James, ...
www.archive.org/ search.php?query=creator%3A%22Legge%2C%20James%2C%201815-1897%22

The Chinese Classics: with a translation, critical and exegetical ...
Start here to download the Project Gutenberg ebook of The Chinese Classics: with a translation, critical and exegetical notes, prolego.
pgeu.net/ etext/ 3100

Readings
The Analects (Lun Yu): Confucian Analects, In The Chinese Classics, translated by James Legge. Reprint by University of Hong Kong, 1949. ...
www.wam.umd.edu/ ~tkang/ welcome_files/ read.htm

THE CHINESE CLASSICS (PROLEGOMENA) by James Legge - Full Text Free ...
THE CHINESE CLASSICS (PROLEGOMENA) by James Legge. Part 4 out of 4. fullbooks.com homepage · Index of THE CHINESE CLASSICS (PROLEGOMENA) · Previous part (3) ...
www.fullbooks.com/ THE-CHINESE-CLASSICS-PROLEGOMENA-4.html

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