The History of the Renowned Don Quixote de la Mancha Translated from the Original Spanish of Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra by Charles Henry Wilmo

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BiblioBazaar, 2010 - 420 pages
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The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now for the first time these high-quality digital copies of original 18th century manuscripts are available in print, making them highly accessible to libraries, undergraduate students, and independent scholars.Western literary study flows out of eighteenth-century works by Alexander Pope, Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Frances Burney, Denis Diderot, Johann Gottfried Herder, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and others. Experience the birth of the modern novel, or compare the development of language using dictionaries and grammar discourses. ++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: ++++British LibraryT059490London: printed for J. Cooke, 1774. 2v., plates; 8

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About the author (2010)

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, born in Alcala de Henares, Spain, in 1547, was the son of a surgeon. In 1585, a few months after his marriage to Catalina de Salazar, Cervantes published his first major work as an author, the pastoral novel La Galatea which was poorly received. Cervantes became a tax collector in Granada in 1594, but was imprisoned in 1597 due to money problems with the government. Folklore maintains that while in prison, Cervantes wrote his most famous novel, Don Quixote, which was an immediate success upon publication in 1605. After several years of writing short novels and plays, Cervantes was spurred to write the sequel to Don Quixote in 1615 when an unauthorized sequel appeared to great acclaim. Don Quixote is considered the defining Spanish literary contribution. It is humorous, bawdy, and human, pitting one man's loyalty to tradition and faith against the world's harsh progress. Though Cervantes' sequel was rushed and flawed, Don Quixote remains a powerful symbol that has endured to present times in many forms. Cervantes died on April 22, 1616, at the age of 69.

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