Avoiding Armageddon: Canadian Military Strategy and Nuclear Weapons, 1950-1963 (Google eBook)

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UBC Press, Jan 1, 2011 - History - 224 pages
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The advent of nuclear weapons in the 1940s brought enormous changes to doctrines regarding the use of force in resolving disputes. American strategists have been widely credited with most of these; Canadians, most have assumed, did not conduct their own strategic analysis. Avoiding Armageddon soundly debunks this notion.

Drawing on previously classified government records, Richter reveals that Canadian defence officials did come to independent strategic understandings of the most critical issues of the nuclear age. Canadian appreciation of deterrence, arms control, and strategic stability differed conceptually from the US models. Similarly, Canadian thinking on the controversial issues of air defence and the domestic acquisition of nuclear weapons was primarily influenced by decidedly Canadian interests.

Avoiding Armageddon is a work with far-reaching implications. It illustrates Canada's considerable latitude for independent defence thinking while providing key historical information that helps make sense of the contemporary Canadian defence debate.

  

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Contents

Introduction
3
1 The Defence and Security Environment 19459
14
2 Canadas Air Defence Debate
37
3 Canadian Views on Nuclear Weapons and Related Issues of Strategy
59
4 The Canadian Debate on the Acquisition of Nuclear Weapons
80
5 Canadian Conceptual Understanding of Arms Control
105
6 Links between Canadian Strategic Thinking and Defence Policy 195063
130
Conclusion
146
Notes
164
Selected Bibliography
200
Index
209
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Andrew Richter is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, University of Windsor.

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