The works of Beaumont & Fletcher: the text formed from a new collation of the early editions (Google eBook)

Front Cover
E. Moxon, 1843
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page l - What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid! Heard words that have been So nimble and so full of subtle flame As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest, And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life.
Page li - Heard words that have been So nimble, and so full of subtle flame, As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life ; then when there hath been thrown Wit able enough to justify the town For three days past ; wit that might warrant be For the whole City to talk foolishly Till that were cancell'd ; and when that was gone, We left an air behind us, which alone Was able to make the two next companies Right witty...
Page lxxx - Servants, with great Applause: Written by the memorable worthies of their time, Mr. John Fletcher and Mr. William Shakespeare, Gent.
Page 358 - Do my face (If thou had'st ever feeling of a sorrow) Thus, thus, Antiphila : strive to make me look Like Sorrow's monument ; and the trees about me, Let them be dry and leafless ; let the rocks Groan with continual surges ; and behind me, Make all a desolation.
Page 309 - So high in thoughts as I : You left a kiss Upon these lips then, which I mean to keep From you for ever. I did hear you talk Far above singing ! After you were gone, I grew acquainted with my heart, and search'd What stirr'd it so : Alas ! I found it love ; Yet far from lust ; for could I but have lived In presence of you, I had had my end.
Page xxv - I would inform you, that this book, in all numbers, is not the same with that which was acted on the public stage; wherein a second pen ' had good share: in place of which, I have rather chosen to put weaker, and, no doubt, less pleasing, of mine own, than to defraud so happy a genius of his right by my loathed usurpation.
Page xxv - Beaumont and Fletcher, of whom I am next to speak, had, with the advantage of Shakespeare's wit, which was their precedent, great natural gifts improved by study; Beaumont especially being so accurate a judge of plays that Ben Jonson, while he lived, submitted all his writings to his censure, and, 'tis thought, used his judgment in correcting, if not contriving all his plots.
Page 345 - Teach you an artificial way to grieve, To keep your sorrow waking. Love your lord No worse than I : but, if you love so well, Alas, you may displease him ! so did I. This is the last time you shall look on me. Ladies, farewell. As soon as I am dead, Come all and watch one night about...
Page 309 - Your worth and virtue; and as I did grow More and more apprehensive, I did thirst To see the man so praised. But yet all this Was but a maiden-longing, to be lost As soon .as found; till, sitting in my window, Printing my thoughts in lawn, I saw a god, I thought (but it was you), enter our gates: My blood flew out and back again, as fast As I had puffed it forth and sucked it in Like breath ; then was I called away in haste To entertain you.
Page 276 - ... guide my feeble hand, You that have power to do it, for I must Perform a piece of justice ! If your youth Have any way offended Heaven, let prayers Short and effectual reconcile you to it. Are. I am prepared. Enter a Country Fellow.

Bibliographic information