Pandora's Seed: The Unforeseen Cost of Civilization (Google eBook)

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Random House Publishing Group, Jun 8, 2010 - Science - 230 pages
32 Reviews
Ten thousand years ago, our species made a radical shift in its way of life: We became farmers rather than hunter-gatherers. Although this decision propelled us into the modern world, renowned geneticist and anthropologist Spencer Wells demonstrates that such a dramatic change in lifestyle had a downside that we’re only now beginning to recognize. Growing grain crops ultimately made humans more sedentary and unhealthy and made the planet more crowded. The expanding population and the need to apportion limited resources created hierarchies and inequalities. Freedom of movement was replaced by a pressure to work that is the forebear of the anxiety millions feel today. Spencer Wells offers a hopeful prescription for altering a life to which we were always ill-suited. Pandora’s Seed is an eye-opening book for anyone fascinated by the past and concerned about the future.
 
  

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Review: Pandora's Seed: The Unforeseen Cost of Civilization

User Review  - Stephanie (LitLoversLane.com) - Goodreads

Review @ www.LitLoversLane.com After reading Wells' The Journey of Man and loving it, I couldn't wait to dig into Pandora's Seed, which promised to illuminate how “advanced” the hunter-gatherer ... Read full review

Review: Pandora's Seed: The Unforeseen Cost of Civilization

User Review  - Lit Lovers Lane - Goodreads

After reading Wells' The Journey of Man and loving it, I couldn't wait to dig into Pandora's Seed, which promised to illuminate how “advanced” the hunter-gatherer societies were and what modern man ... Read full review

Contents

Growinga New Culture I I 25
61
Demented
92
FastForward
123
Heated Argument I
152
Toward a New Mythos
184
Acknowledgments 4 4
211
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

 
Spencer Wells is an Explorer-in-Residence at the National Geographic Society and Frank H. T. Rhodes Class of ’56 Professor at Cornell University. He leads the Genographic Project, which is collecting and analyzing hundreds of thousands of DNA samples from people around the world in order to decipher how our ancestors populated the planet. Wells received his Ph.D. from Harvard University and conducted postdoctoral work at Stanford and Oxford. He has written two books, The Journey of Man and Deep Ancestry. He lives in Washington, D.C., with his wife, a documentary filmmaker.
 


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