Alien Species in North America and Hawaii

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Island Press, Sep 1, 1999 - Nature - 387 pages
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The world is in the midst of an ecological explosion with devastating implications. Thousands of species of microbes, plants, and animals are being introduced, both deliberately and inadvertently, to new land areas, seas, and freshwaters. In many regions, these new colonists are running wild, disrupting the dynamics of ecosystems, pushing native species toward extinction, and causing billions of dollars in direct economic damages.Alien Species in North America and Hawaii provides a comprehensive overview of the invasive species phenomenon, examining the threats posed and the damage that has already been done to ecosystems across North America and Hawaii. George W. Cox considers both the biological theory underlying invasions and the potential and actual effects on ecosystems and human activities. His book offers a framework for understanding the problem and provides a detailed examination of species and regions. Specific chapters examine: North American invaders and their threats how exotic species are dispersed to new regions how physical and biotic features influence the establishment and spread of invasives patterns of exotic invasions, with separate chapters covering each of the ten most seriously invaded regions and ecosystems patterns of invasiveness exhibited by major groups of exotics the theory of invasive capability of alien species and the resistance of communities to invasion theoretical aspects of ecosystem impacts of invaders and the evolutionary interaction of invaders and natives management and public policy issuesAlien Species in North America and Hawaii offers for the first time an assessment and synthesis of the problem of invasive species in North American and Hawaiian ecosystems. Scientists, conservation professionals, policymakers, and anyone involved with the study and control of invasive species will find the book an essential guide and reference to one of the most serious and widespread threats to global biodiversity.
  

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Contents

The Threat of Exotics Biotic Pollution
3
North American Invaders The Invited and the Uninvited
13
A Brief History of Invasions Human History An Exotics Perspective
25
Regional Perspectives
37
The Eastern Seaboard Exotics Discover America
39
West Coast Bays and Estuaries Swamping the Natives
53
Northern Temperate Lakes Chaos along the Food Chain
67
Western Rivers and Streams Pollution That Wont Wash Away
83
Homegrown Exotics Natives Out of Place
205
Human Domesticates and Associates Our Best Friends and Closest Associates
219
Theoretical Perspectives
233
Exotics and Community Structure Biodiversity Bombs
235
Exotics and Ecosystem Impacts Changing the Way Nature Works
249
Exotics and Evolution Assimilation or Conquest?
263
Policy Perspectives
279
Living with Exotics The Ecological Economics of Exotics
281

Eastern Forests The Dark Side of Forest Biodiversity
95
Florida and the Gulf Lowlands Hostile Ecosystem Takeovers
111
Plains and Intermontane Grasslands Exotics at Home on the Range
127
Western Floodplains Disturbing the Disturbance Regime
143
The Pacific States Mediterranean Mixing Pot
159
Hawaiian Islands Exotics in the Islands of Eden
173
Biotic Perspectives
189
Exotic Game and Fish Addiction to Game and Fish Introduction
191
Exotics and Public Policy Are All Exotics Undesirable?
299
Literature Cited
315
Glossary
359
Internet Sources for Exotic Species
363
About the Author
367
Index
369
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Cox is emeritus professor of ecology at San Diego State University. He is also active in research and writing in ecology, conservation biology, and ornithology.

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