Voting and the spirit of American democracy: essays on the history of voting and voting rights in America

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University of Illinois Press, Mar 1, 1992 - Political Science - 123 pages
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This overview of the historical development of the right to vote is the first to appear in over twenty years. Writing in a succinct and lively manner, leading historians and political scientists trace the history of American voting from the colonial period to the present, incorporating the latest scholarship on suffrage reform, woman suffrage, black voting rights, and electoral participation. They explain how voting practices changed over time as the result of broad historical forces such as economic growth, demographic shifts, the results of war, and the rise of political reform movements. By viewing voting within a broad historical context, this book distinguishes itself from narrow, specialized studies, making it a valuable volume for students and general readers.

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Contents

The American People as Christian White
19
Immigration and the Struggle
43
Voting Women
67
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

DONALD W. ROGERS, PhD, is Professor Emeritus at Long Island University. For forty years, Professor Rogers has taught academic courses in physical chemistry, thermodynamics, general chemistry, computational chemistry, and microcomputer interfacing. He publishes regularly in the Journal of Physical Chemistry and elsewhere, and his work has been supported for the last decade by the National Science Foundation through the National Center for Supercomputing Applications.

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