Survey nonresponse

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Wiley, 2002 - Business & Economics - 500 pages
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A compendium of up-to-date research in survey nonresponse

Survey Nonresponse compiles theoretical and empirical research by noted experts to provide a current review of the field. It covers the behavioral underpinnings of non-response, its impact on the error structure of survey estimates, and current methods of adjusting the estimation process to account for nonresponse.

The volume combines literatures from social science and statistics to present a complete picture of modern methods of design and estimation in the face of missing survey data. The book is divided into four sections that discuss these fundamental issues:
* Alternative perspectives on causes and consequences of nonresponse
* Current theory and practice in survey protocols to reduce nonresponse rates
* How nonresponse varies systematically by various design features
* Statistical inference accounting for nonresponse


Survey Nonresponse can be used as a supplementary text for graduate students in survey methodology courses, or as a reference for researchers and professionals. It offers a balanced approach, up-to-date research, and thoroughly modern thinking on this vital subject.

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Contents

Survey Nonresponse in Design Data Collection and Analysis
3
Developing Nonresponse Standards
27
A Longitudinal
41
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

ROBERT M. GROVES, PhD, is a professor and a senior research scientist at the University of Michigan. He is also Director of the Joint Program in Survey Methodology, a consortium of the University of Maryland, University of Michigan, and Westat.

DON A. DILLMAN, PhD, is Professor of Sociology and Rural Sociology at Washington State University, a senior scientist for the Gallup Organization, and previously a senior survey methodologist at the U. S. Census Bureau.

JOHN L. ELTINGE, PhD, is a senior mathematical statistician at the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and an associate professor in the Department of Statistics at Texas A&M University.

RODERICK J. A. LITTLE, PhD, is Professor and Chair of Biostatistics in the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan and a senior research scientist at its Institute for Social Research.