Charlie needs a cloak

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers, 1988 - Family & Relationships - 32 pages
20 Reviews
A shepherd shears his sheep, cards and spins the wool, weaves and dyes the cloth, and sews a new red cloak

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Excellent book and illustrations! - Christianbook.com
The illustrations looked outdated. - Goodreads
The pictures are simple and appealing to the eye. - Goodreads

Review: Charlie Needs a Cloak

User Review  - Ms Threlkeld - Goodreads

A solidly written story about the process and work involved in created an article of clothing. I especially liked the small, surprising details in the illustrations and the way de Paola brings out the personality of each animal. Read full review

Review: Charlie Needs a Cloak

User Review  - Haydee Romero - Goodreads

“Charlie needs a cloak” is a cute, short story about Charlie making his much needed cloak. I absolutely love the illustrations because they add more to the story (the mischievous sheep). I would use ... Read full review

About the author (1988)

Tomie dePaola is an artist, designer, educator, painter, muralist, author, and illustrator. He was born in Meriden, Connecticut on September 15, 1934. He received a B.F.A. from Pratt Institute in 1956, a M.F.A. from California College of Arts and Crafts in 1969, and a doctoral equivalency from Lone Mountain College in 1970. He has written and/or illustrated more than 200 books including 26 Fairmount Avenue, Strega Nona, and Meet the Barkers. He has received numerous awards for his work including the Caldecott Honor Award, the Newbery Honor Award and the New Hampshire Governor's Arts Award of Living Treasure. His murals and paintings can be seen in many churches and monasteries throughout New England. He has designed greeting cards, magazine and record album covers, and theater sets. His work is shown in galleries and museums, and his books have been published in more than 15 countries.

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