The Book of Snobs by One of Themselves (Google eBook)

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ReadHowYouWant.com, Oct 1, 2006 - History - 260 pages
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An amazing book penned with masterly skills by William Makepeace Thackeray. It explores various kinds of English snobs including the military snob and the country snob in a humorous and satirical manner. The author has unique and eloquent writing style which makes the book highly captivating and worth reading.
  

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Contents

Chapter 1
1
Chapter 2
7
Chapter 3
12
Chapter 4
17
Chapter 5
23
Chapter 6
28
Chapter 7
33
Chapter 8
40
Chapter 24
124
Chapter 25
129
Chapter 26
136
Chapter 27
141
Chapter 28
146
Chapter 29
153
Chapter 30
159
Chapter 31
163

Chapter 9
46
Chapter 10
51
Chapter 11
56
Chapter 12
60
Chapter 13
66
Chapter 14
70
Chapter 15
76
Chapter 16
80
Chapter 17
85
Chapter 18
90
Chapter 19
96
Chapter 20
101
Chapter 21
107
Chapter 22
113
Chapter 23
118
Chapter 32
168
Chapter 33
175
Chapter 34
180
Chapter 35
186
Chapter 36
193
Chapter 37
199
Chapter 38
205
Chapter 39
209
Chapter 40
213
Chapter 41
219
Chapter 42
223
Chapter 43
229
Chapter 44
235
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 9 - Is it to be honest, to be gentle, to be generous, to be brave, to be wise, and, possessing all these qualities, to exercise them in the most graceful outward manner?
Page iii - Deep and Abiding Thankfulness) an eye for a Snob. If the Truthful is the Beautiful, it is Beautiful to study even the Snobbish; to track Snobs through history, as certain little dogs in Hampshire hunt out truffles; to sink shafts in society and come upon rich veins of Snobore. Snobbishness is like Death in a quotation from Horace, which I hope you never have heard, 'beating with equal foot at poor men's doors, and kicking at the gates of Emperors.
Page 6 - ... to Diddloff. The Russian's eyes rolled dreadfully as he received it: he swallowed it with a grimace that I thought must precede a convulsion, and seizing a bottle next him, which he thought was Sauterne, but which turned out to be French brandy, he drank off nearly a pint before he know his error.

About the author (2006)

William Makepeace Thackeray was born in Calcutta, India, where his father was in service to the East India Company. After the death of his father in 1816, he was sent to England to attend school. Upon reaching college age, Thackeray attended Trinity College, Cambridge, but he left before completing his degree. Instead, he devoted his time to traveling and journalism. Generally considered the most effective satirist and humorist of the mid-nineteenth century, Thackeray moved from humorous journalism to successful fiction with a facility that was partially the result of a genial fictional persona and a graceful, relaxed style. At his best, he held up a mirror to Victorian manners and morals, gently satirizing, with a tone of sophisticated acceptance, the inevitable failure of the individual and of society. He took up the popular fictional situation of the young person of talent who must make his way in the world and dramatized it with satiric directness in The Luck of Barry Lyndon (1844), with the highest fictional skill and appreciation of complexities inherent within the satiric vision in his masterpiece, Vanity Fair (1847), and with a great subtlety of point of view and background in his one historical novel, Henry Esmond (1852). Vanity Fair, a complex interweaving in a vast historical panorama of a large number of characters, derives its title from John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and attempts to invert for satirical purposes, the traditional Christian image of the City of God. Vanity Fair, the corrupt City of Man, remains Thackeray's most appreciated and widely read novel. It contrasts the lives of two boarding-school friends, Becky Sharp and Amelia Smedley. Constantly attuned to the demands of incidental journalism and his sense of professionalism in his relationship with his public, Thackeray wrote entertaining sketches and children's stories and published his humorous lectures on eighteenth-century life and literature. His own fiction shows the influence of his dedication to such eighteenth-century models as Henry Fielding, particularly in his satire, which accepts human nature rather than condemns it and takes quite seriously the applicability of the true English gentleman as a model for moral behavior. Thackeray requested that no authorized biography of him should ever be written, but members of his family did write about him, and these accounts were subsequently published.

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