Catalogue of Lithophytes Or Stony Corals in the Collection of the British Museum (Google eBook)

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order of the Trustees, 1870 - Corals - 51 pages
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Page 1 - Coral tree-like, or expanded, fixed by an expanded base, supported by more or less abundant fusiform calcareous spicula, and often supported by a central calcareous or horny tree-like axis, with an expanded base. Living attached by the base of the coral and axis to rocks on the sea shore.
Page 13 - Coral irregularly branching, nearly on a plane. The axis consists alternately of calcareous and suberous segments, of uniform thickness, traversed by numerous narrow sulcations. The branches originate from the calcareous segments. Coenenchyma [bark] persistent, rather thin, somewhat membranous, with a rough surface.
Page 37 - Coral slender (simple or subsimple), rod-like. Axis slender, cylindrical, hair-like, solid, white, calcareous, attached by a broad base. Bark (when dry) thin, smooth, granular, with a series of subcylindrical polypiferous cells placed alternately on each side of the stem. Lateral groove indistinct.
Page 22 - CORALLID^E. Axis inarticulate, solid, calcareous, more or less hard and stony. Bark smooth, granular, with irregular-shaped calcareous spicula. Polypiferous cells simple, more or less exserted. The chemical character of the axis may be easily discovered by a small quantity of muriatic acid.
Page 25 - Coral simple or furcately branched ; branches subcylindrical, with a more or less distinct lateral groove, especially at the base. Axis continuous, opake, solid, calcareous, hard at the base, white and softer above. Bark when dry granular, thin, with numerous series of sunken or slightly prominent polypiferous cells on each edge of the stems and branches.
Page 45 - Trank large, arborescent, branching in a dichotomous manner, often very thick and stony near the base ; branchlets round, tapering to slender flexible points. Cells large, campanulate, irregularly scattered ; the cells are capable of moving in different directions, but in preserved specimens are generally turned downward. (Coll. Essex Inst.) St. George's Bay and Bay of Fundy, in deep waters ; Northern Seas of Europe.
Page 44 - ... scales form a ring, and are eight in number, within which, in the retracted polypes, there is a coniform outstanding lid, which is formed out of eight long flat scales. Besides, the polypes at the base of the branches possess eight rows of small calcareous bodies (spicula), and indeed, small out-pressed double clubs, covered with small warts and spines, approaching to simple spicules.
Page 42 - Calyptrojihura japonica. of the cell and wide at the other end ; the lower surface of the outer aperture is furnished with two elongated horn-like processes. To the centre of this basal cone is articulated or affixed a similar pellucid horn-coloured cone or rather conical vase, which is furnished with a slightly keeled edge at its widest part, and then contracts as if it had a shorter conical lid, with an aperture in the middle of this lid-like contracted part for the emission of the polype. The...
Page 42 - ... the cell and wide at the other end ; the lower surface of the outer aperture is furnished with two elongated horn-like processes. To the centre of this basal cone is articulated or affixed a similar pellucid horn-coloured cone or rather conical vase, which is furnished with a slightly keeled edge at its widest part, and then contracts as if it had a shorter conical lid, with an aperture in the middle of this lid-like contracted part for the emission of the polype. The two cones are as it were...
Page 44 - The axis horny, black, solid, cylindrical, the base being often covered with a hard, calcareous, longitudinally striated outer coat.

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