The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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The Society, 1904 - Irish
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Each volume contains the Society's meetings, proceedings, etc.
  

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Page 70 - He kept a journal of his observations and experiences. The same has been published and narrates many interesting incidents of the siege. The journal may be found in Papers Relating Chiefly to the Maryland Line During the Revolution, edited by Thomas Balch.
Page 85 - calamity, is now raging in this county. Neither age nor sex, nor even acknowledged innocence is sufficient to excite mercy or afford protection. The only crime which the unfortunate objects of this persecution are charged with is a crime of easy proof, indeed, it is simply a profession of the Roman Catholic faith.
Page 90 - The slaves who are carried from the coast of Africa have much more room allowed them than the immigrants who pass from Ireland to America, for the avarice of the captains in that trade is such that they think they never can load their vessels sufficiently, and they trouble their heads in general no more about the accommodation and
Page 85 - no secret that a persecution accompanied with all the circumstances of ferocious cruelty, which have in all ages distinguished that calamity, is now raging in this county.
Page 113 - [Galway] where they parted, Mr. Winthrop taking his journey over land to Dublin, and Mr. Wilson by sea. His ship was forced back by tempest to Kinsale. Mr. Wilson being in Ireland, gave much satisfaction to the Christians there about New England. Mr.
Page 112 - Sweet waves the sea of summer flowers Around our wayside cot so coy, Where Eileen sings away the hours That light my task in Illinois. CHORUS— " The Irish homes of Illinois, The happy homes of Illinois, No landlord there Can cause despair, Nor blight our fields in Illinois
Page 100 - of August. Imitating the forest eloquence with which he had long been familiar, he thus addressed the convention : " Children, we are very glad to see so many of you present at your ancient council fire, which has been neglected for some time past. Since then high winds have blown and raised heavy clouds over your country. I now by this belt rekindle your ancient
Page 124 - May, 1677, it was ORDERED that a certain tract of land in some convenient place in the Narragansett country, shall be laid forth into one hundred acre shares, with the house lots, for the accommodation of so many of the inhabitants of this Colony as stand in need of land, and the General Assembly shall judge fit to be supplied.
Page 90 - the captains in that trade is such that they think they never can load their vessels sufficiently, and they trouble their heads in general no more about the accommodation and storage of their passengers than of any other lumber aboard.
Page 114 - to Dublin, and from thence to Antrim in the North and came to the house of Sir John Clotworthy, the evening before the day when divers godly persons were appointed to meet at his house, to confer about their voyage to New England, by whom they were thoroughly informed of all things and received great encouragement to proceed on their intended course." Sometimes immigrants from Ireland were

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