Killing for Coal: America's Deadliest Labor War

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Harvard University Press, 2008 - Business & Economics - 386 pages
13 Reviews

On a spring morning in 1914, in the stark foothills of southern Colorado, members of the United Mine Workers of America clashed with guards employed by the Rockefeller family, and a state militia beholden to Colorado‚e(tm)s industrial barons. When the dust settled, nineteen men, women, and children among the miners‚e(tm) families lay dead. The strikers had killed at least thirty men, destroyed six mines, and laid waste to two company towns.

Killing for Coal offers a bold and original perspective on the 1914 Ludlow Massacre and the ‚eoeGreat Coalfield War.‚e In a sweeping story of transformation that begins in the coal beds and culminates with the deadliest strike in American history, Thomas Andrews illuminates the causes and consequences of the militancy that erupted in colliers‚e(tm) strikes over the course of nearly half a century. He reveals a complex world shaped by the connected forces of land, labor, corporate industrialization, and workers‚e(tm) resistance.

Brilliantly conceived and written, this book takes the organic world as its starting point. The resulting elucidation of the coalfield wars goes far beyond traditional labor history. Considering issues of social and environmental justice in the context of an economy dependent on fossil fuel, Andrews makes a powerful case for rethinking the relationships that unite and divide workers, consumers, capitalists, and the natural world.

  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - earthwind - LibraryThing

The author has encapsulated numerous social and economic conditions into a coherent chronicle of life struggling to exist both in and above the coal mines for the men and their families. It is a ... Read full review

Review: Killing for Coal: America's Deadliest Labor War

User Review  - Kathy - Goodreads

Reading this book gave me a new insight into the developmental history of industrialized Colorado. The combination of railroads and William Jackson Palmers influence on the development of the coal ... Read full review

Contents

A Dream of CoalFired Benevolence
20
The Reek of the New Industrialism
50
Riding the Wave to Survive an Earth Transformed
87
Dying with Their Boots On
122
Out of the Depths and on to the March
157
The Quest for Containment
197
Shouting the Battle Cry of Union
233
Epilogue
287
Abbreviations
293
Notes
295
Acknowledgments
371
Index
377
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Thomas G. Andrewsis Assistant Professor ofHistory, University of Colorado Denver.

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