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Books Books 1 - 10 of 10 on ... of the same fluid, the pressure of the atmosphere is wholly removed from the....  
" ... of the same fluid, the pressure of the atmosphere is wholly removed from the upper surface of the mercury in the tube, while it continues to act on the mercury in the bason, and by its means on the lower surface of the column in the tube. "
Rudiments of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy - Page 103
by Denison Olmsted - 1852 - 115 pages
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Gallery of Nature and Art, Or a Tour Through Creation and Science ..., Volume 4

E. Polehamton - 1815
...is capable of counteracting a much greater hydrostatic or pneumatic pressure. When a tube of glass, about three feet long, closed at one end and open at the other, is filled with mercury, and then immersed in a bason of the same fluid, the pressure of the...
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The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of Science ..., Volume 14

Thomas Curtis - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1829
...seven inches and a half above the level of the reservoir from which it rises. But when a tube of glass, about three feet long, closed at one end and open at the other, is filled with mercury, and them immersed in a basin of the same fluid, the pressure of the...
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A course of lectures on natural philosophy and the mechanical arts, Volume 1

Thomas Young - 1845
...is capable of counteracting a much greater hydrostatic or pneumatic pressure. When a tube of glass about three feet long, closed at one end and open at the other, is filled with mercury, and then immersed in a bason of the same fluid, the pressure of the...
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An Attempt to Develop the Law of Storms by Means of Facts, Arranged ...

Sir William Reid - Storms - 1846 - 572 pages
...inches of mercury will also counterpoise the atmosphere. The principle of the barometer is simple. If a tube, about three feet long, closed at one end and open at the other, be filled with mercury, and, with the open end stopped by a finger, this tube be reversed, and...
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AN ATTEMPT TO DEVELOP THE LAW OF STORMS BY MEANS OF FACTS. ACCORDING TO ...

LIEUT-COLONEL W. REID - 1850
...inches of mercury will also counterpoise the atmosphere. The principle of the barometer is simple. If a tube, about three feet long, closed at one end and open at the other, be filled with mercury, and, with the open end stopped by a finger, this tube be reversed, and...
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Rudiments of Natural Philosophy

Denison Olmsted - 1852
...than one of water, will balance the weight of an atmospheric column. This will imply a column about 2J feet, or 30 inches high ; and it will be much more...high. We will therefore take a glass tube about three foot long, closed at one end and open at the other, fill it with quicksilver, and placing the finger...
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The Mechanics of Daily Life

Vincent Perronet Sells - Mechanics - 1893 - 181 pages
...height of the water column, calculated from the relative To perfectly exclude the air Torricelli took a glass tube, about three feet long, closed at one end, and entirely filled with mercury, and inverted this in a cistern of the same metal. The mercury then sank...
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Physics Introductory to Physical Geography

Charles Frederic Dutton (jr.) - Physics - 1896 - 60 pages
...(pressure measure) is used to predict changes in the weather. 35. The barometer, Fig. 6, consists of a glass tube about three feet long, closed at one end and open at the other. The tube is filled with mercury, and the open end placed in a cup of the same metal. Since the...
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Essentials of Modern Physics

Charles Elwood Dull - Physics - 1922 - 525 pages
...Torricelli also found a method of measuring the atmospheric pressure. His experiment may be easily repeated. Take a glass tube about three feet long, closed at one end, fill it with mercury, place the thumb over the open end, and invert the tube in a bowl of mercury....
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The Philosophical Magazine, Volume 33

Alexander Tilloch - Science - 1809
...that the mercury would rise.iJ^th the height of the water : this he found exactly to answer. He filled a glass tube about three feet long, closed at one end and exhausted of its air, and inverted it into a bason of mercury ; the mercury rose 29 inches, = -rVth...
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