Delhi

Front Cover
Penguin Books India, 1990 - Fiction - 391 pages
55 Reviews
I Return To Delhi As I Return To My Mistress Bhagmati When I Have Had My Fill Of Whoring In Foreign Lands&

Thus Begins Khushwant Singh S Vast, Erotic, Irrelevant Magnum Opus On The City Of Delhi. The Principal Narrator Of The Saga, Which Extends Over Six Hundred Years, Is A Bawdy, Ageing Reprobate Who Loves Delhi As Much As He Does The Hijda Whore Bhagmati-Half Man, Half Woman With Sexual Inventiveness And Energy Of Both The Sexes. Travelling Through Time, Space And History To Discover His Beloved City, The Narrator Meets A Myriad Of People-Poets And Princes, Saints And Sultans, Temptresses And Traitors, Emperors And Eunuchs-Who Have Shaped And Endowed Delhi With Its Very Special Mystique& And As We Accompany The Narrator On His Epic Journey We Find The City Of Emperors Transformed And Immortalized In Our Minds For Ever.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
15
4 stars
19
3 stars
13
2 stars
3
1 star
5

Review: Delhi

User Review  - Ashesh - Goodreads

It gives a picture of 500 years of Delhi's history painted in the perspective of those who belong to different shades ranging from being oppressor to the oppressed. There are two narratives at the ... Read full review

Review: Delhi

User Review  - Ratan Sadanandan OM - Goodreads

I found the historical accounts in the book to be really interesting; the accounts of POV characters like Timur, Aurangzeb, Bahadur Shah Zafar and other fictional citizens from various periods between ... Read full review

Contents

Delhi
1
Bhagmati
28
Musaddi Lal _
50
Bhagmati
87
Bhagmati
103
The Untouchables
123
Bhagmati
137
Bhagmati
164
Bhagmati
193
Bhagmati
233
237
314
Bhagmati
347
Bhagmati
375
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1990)

Khushwant Singh was born on February 2, 1915 in the village of Hadali in what is now the Punjab province of Pakistan. He attended St. Stephen's College in Delhi, Government College in Lahore, and King's College London. In 1947, he worked for India's ministry of external affairs and served as press officer in Ottawa and London. From 1980 to 1986, he was a member of the upper house of the Indian parliament. He was an author and journalist. His newspaper column, With Malice Towards One and All, was syndicated all over India. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 100 novels and short-story collections including Train to Pakistan, I Shall Not Hear the Nightingale, Delhi: A Novel, The Company of Women, and The Sunset Club. He also wrote a two-volume History of the Sikhs, an autobiography entitled Truth, Love and a Little Malice, and a book of biographical profiles entitled The Good, the Bad and the Ridiculous. He died on March 20, 2014 at the age of 99.

Bibliographic information