Library Planning: Bookstacks and Shelving (Google eBook)

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Snead iron works, Incorporated, 1915 - Shelving for books - 271 pages
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Page 131 - The architects who furnished the original designs were John L. Smithmeyer and Paul J. Pelz. By the act of October 2, 1888, before the foundations were laid, Thomas L. Casey, Chief of Engineers of the Army, was placed in charge of the construction of the building, and the architectural details were worked out by Paul J. Pelz and Edward P. Casey. Upon the death of General Casey, in March, 1896, the entire charge of the construction devolved upon Bernard R.
Page 112 - A location that must present architectural facades on all sides is unfavorable to extension. It is better to have a distinct front and rear. A corner lot or a site with parking all around it necessitates a greater expenditure for building materials, while an inside lot, with good frontage, admits of a utilitarian stack in the rear without any architectural pretensions whatsoever. Sloping ground is advantageous for practical reasons as giving a chance for a high basement in the rear, with two or more...
Page 117 - ... and physical meat, drink and drugs are standardized by wily doctors and Dr Wileys so that no apology may be necessary to introduce a little standardizing of library matters outside of what the Library Bureau, Dean Brett and others have already accomplished. Mine refers to a standardized computation of the cost of a building in relation to its seating capacity for readers and to its volume capacity, allowing 30 square feet floor space to each reader, as full capacity in rooms allotted to reading...
Page 110 - The future as well as the present must be considered and other libraries should be visited with a mind open for new impressions and ready 'to graft any improved ideas upon the parent stock.
Page 108 - Every library building should be planned for the k;nd of work to be done, and the community to be served. / "The interior arrangement should be planned before the exterior is considered. "Plans should provide for future growth and development. "A library should be carefully planned for economical administration. "Public rooms should be planned for complete supervision by the fewest possible attendants. "No convenience of arrangement should be sacrificed for architectural effect. "There should be...
Page 114 - ... the building handsome proportions and beautiful tints, but does preclude expensive outlay, which nullifies rather than enhances the workableness of the "silence" rooms. The lighting of the library is of paramount importance, and to accomplish a satisfactory result it is well to follow the schoolhouse requirements and make the glass area of reading rooms equal to 20 per cent. of their floor areas. The light from the windows will be effective in the room for a distance equal to about one and one-half...
Page 110 - There is a general feeling that the problems of adapting library buildings to the changing methods of library administration will be worked out by the library and the architectural professions jointly. As stated by one architect, the first work must be done by the librarian and should consist in reducing to writing a description of the purpose and scope of the library, particularly helpful if the library be of some such special type as that of a college or university.
Page 165 - Of this sum approximately $800,000 was spent upon the building and its furniture, and $200,000 set aside as an endowment fund for the physical maintenance of the building. Ground was broken January 10, 1910, on the fourth anniversary of the death of President Harper. The cornerstone was laid June 14, 1910. The building was...
Page 165 - The newly-adopted coat of arms of the University of Chicago has been used in a number of places. The center court, bounded on the south by the library building, on the east by the Law school and on the west by...
Page 116 - ... by 40 if two tiers be required, and so on. Conversely, if we wish to know the size stack room necessary to house 100,000 volumes in one tier seven shelves high, we divide by 20, giving 5000 square feet; for two tiers divide by 40, giving 2500 square feet; for three tiers, divide by 60, giving 1667 square feet, and so on. Metal stack construction is an invention of recent years, and its rapid development has kept pace with the modern library demands. There are several makes of metal stacks upon...

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