Gregor Mendel: The Friar Who Grew Peas

Front Cover
Harry N. Abrams, Sep 1, 2006 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 40 pages
25 Reviews
The only picture book available about the father of genetics and his pea plants!

How do mothers and fathers—whether they are apple trees, sheep, or humans—pass down traits to their children? This question fascinated Gregor Mendel throughout his life. Regarded as the world's first geneticist, Mendel overcame poverty and obscurity to discover one of the fundamental aspects of genetic science: animals, plants, and people all inherit and pass down traits through the same process, following the same rules.

Living the slow-paced, contemplative life of a friar, Gregor Mendel was able to conceive and put into practice his great experiment: growing multiple generations of peas. From observing yellow peas, green peas, smooth peas, and wrinkled peas, Mendel crafted his theory of heredity—years before scientists had any notion of genes.

Children will be inspired by Gregor's neverending search for knowledge, and his famous experiments are easy to understand as an introduction to genetics. The only picture book available about the father of genetics and his pea plants!

How do mothers and fathers—whether they are apple trees, sheep, or humans—pass down traits to their children? This question fascinated Gregor Mendel throughout his life. Regarded as the world's first geneticist, Mendel overcame poverty and obscurity to discover one of the fundamental aspects of genetic science: animals, plants, and people all inherit and pass down traits through the same process, following the same rules.

Living the slow-paced, contemplative life of a friar, Gregor Mendel was able to conceive and put into practice his great experiment: growing multiple generations of peas. From observing yellow peas, green peas, smooth peas, and wrinkled peas, Mendel crafted his theory of heredity—years before scientists had any notion of genes.

Children will be inspired by Gregor's neverending search for knowledge, and his famous experiments are easy to understand as an introduction to genetics.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
14
3 stars
6
2 stars
0
1 star
0

The illustrations are amazing. - LibraryThing
Nice biography and introduction to genetics. - Goodreads
The illustrations are done really well also. - LibraryThing
I like the pictures and that it is told like a story. - Goodreads

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - qrennaker - LibraryThing

This book is an informational/ biographical account of the work and life of Gregor Mendel who is known as the father of genetics. I found this book to be very well done and simple enough for even ... Read full review

Review: Gregor Mendel: The Friar Who Grew Peas

User Review  - Anne Lawson - Goodreads

This title was part of Ambleside Online's year 4 curriculum. David (9) loved it. It's in picture book format but the words are not dumbed-down but an excellent example of living narrative nonfiction ... Read full review

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Cheryl Bardoe is Senior Project Manager of Exhibitions at the Field Museum of Chicago. She lives in Chicago, Illinois.

Betty Levin is the author of many popular books for young people, including "The Banished; Look Back, Moss; Away to Me, Moss; Island Bound; Fire in the Wind;" and "The Trouble with Gramary. " Betty Levin has a sheep farm in Lincoln, Massachusetts, where she also raises and trains sheepdogs. In Her Own Words...

"I started writing stories almost as soon as I began to read. They were derivative and predictable-as much a way of revisiting characters and places in books I loved as it was a means of self-expression. I don't remember when words and their use became important. In the beginning was the story, and for a long time it was all that mattered.

"Even though I always wrote, I imagined becoming an explorer or an animal trainer. This was long before I had to be gainfully employed. It wasn't until after I'd landed in the workplace, first in museum research and then in teaching, that I returned to story writing-this time for my young children. Then a fellowship in creative writing at the Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College gave me and my storymaking a chance. One affirmation led to another, and now there are books-and some readers.

"When I talk with children in schools and libraries, I realize that child readers are still out there. When they get excited about a character or a scene, a new dimension opens for them, a new way of seeing and feeling and understanding.

"Of course there is always one child who asks how it feels to be famous and to be recognized in supermarkets. I explain that the only people who recognize me are those who have seen me working my sheep dogs or selling my wool at sheep fairs. That response often prompts another query: Why write books if they don't make you rich and famous? I usually toss that question back at the children. Why do they invent stories? How does story writing make them feel?

"Eventually we explore the distinction between wanting to be a writer and needing to write. If we want to write, then we must and will. Whether or not we become published authors, we all have tales to tell and stories to share. Literature can only continue to grow from the roots of our collective experience if children understand that they are born creative and that all humans are myth users and storytellers.

Bibliographic information