The History of England, from the First Invasion by the Romans, Volume 5 (Google eBook)

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J. Mawman, 1825 - Great Britain
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Page 472 - I shall rehearse you the dolorous end of those babes ; not after every way that I have heard, but after that way that I have so heard, by such men and by such means, as methinketh it were hard but it should be true.
Page 24 - I would not have a single man more. If God gives us the victory, the fewer we are the more honour ; and, if we lose, the less will be the loss to our country. But we will not lose ; fight as you were wont to do, and before night the pride of our numberless enemies shall be humbled to the dust.
Page 459 - It may please your grace, that were not for " mine ease: they are most of them my retainers, that " are come to do me service at such a time as this, and " chiefly to see your grace." The king started a little, and said, " By my faith, my lord, I thank you for my " good cheer, but I may not endure to have my laws " broken in my sight; my attorney must speak with
Page 221 - When he was asked his name, unable to speak through terror, he fell on his knees ; and his attendant, thinking to save him, said that he was the son of the duke. " Then," exclaimed Clifford, " as thy father slew mine, " so will I slay thee, and all of thy kin," and plunging his dagger into the breast of the young prince, bade the tutor go, and bear the news to the boy's mother. The queen on her arrival was presented with the head of her enemy, the duke, and ordered it to be encircled with a diadem...
Page 198 - Monday afternoon the Queen came to him, and brought my Lord Prince* with her, and then he asked what the prince's name was, and the queen told him Edward ; and then he held up his hands, and thanked God thereof.
Page 179 - At the same time he wrote to his son a most eloquent and affectionate letter, laying down rules for his conduct, and inculcating in the most forcible terms the duty of piety towards God, loyalty to the king, and obedience to his mother.
Page 447 - ... thereunto. Then the King thanked her of her good comfort. After that she was departed and come to her own chamber...
Page 367 - Writers have indeed in modern times attempted to prove his innocence; but their arguments are rather ingenious than conclusive, and dwindle into groundless conjectures when confronted with the evidence which may be arrayed against them.
Page 338 - ... evidently that the said King Edward, during his life, and the said Elizabeth, lived together sinfully and damnably in adultery against the law of God and of his church.
Page 217 - My father was King; his father also was King; I myself have worn the crown forty years from my cradle ; you have all sworn fealty to me as your sovereign, and your fathers have done the like to mine. How then can my right be disputed...

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