WHAT IS FREE TRADE? (Google eBook)

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Page 72 - GENTLEMEN You are in the right way: you reject abstract theories; abundance, cheapness, concerns you little. You are entirely occupied with the interest of the producer, whom you are anxious to free from foreign competition. In a word, you wish to secure the national market to national labor. We come now to offer you an admirable opportunity for the application of your what shall we say? your theory? no, nothing is more deceiving than theory your doctrine? your system? your principle?...
Page 72 - We are subjected to the intolerable competition of a foreign rival, who enjoys, it would seem, such superior facilities for the production of light, that he is enabled to inundate our national market at so exceedingly reduced a price, that, the moment he makes his appearance, he draws off all custom for us; and thus an important branch of French industry, with all its innumerable ramifications, is suddenly reduced to a state of complete stagnation.
Page 161 - Like every author distinguished for true comic humor, there was a deep vein of melancholy pathos running through his mirth, and even when his sun shone brightly its light seemed often reflected as if only over the rim of a cloud.
Page 75 - Anzin down to the poorest vender of matches, who is not interested in the success of our petition. We foresee your objections, gentlemen; but there is not one that you can oppose to us which you will not be obliged to gather from the works of the partisans of free trade. We dare challenge you to pronounce one word against our petition, which is not equally opposed to your own practice and the principle which guides your policy. Do you tell us, that if we gain by this protection, France will not gain,...
Page 75 - Do you tell us, that if we gain by this protection, France will not gain, because the consumer must pay the price of it ? We answer you : You have no longer any right to cite the interest of the consumer. For whenever this has been found to compete with that of the producer, you have invariably sacrificed the first. You have done this to encourage labor, to increase the demand for labor. The same reason should now induce you to act in the same manner. You have yourselves already answered the objection....
Page 74 - Gentlemen, if you will be pleased to reflect, you cannot fail to be convinced that there is perhaps not one Frenchman, from the opulent stockholder of Anzin down to the poorest vender of matches, who is not interested in the success of our petition.
Page 74 - If more tallow be consumed, there will arise a necessity for an increase of cattle and sheep. Thus artificial meadows must be in greater demand; and meat, wool, leather, and, above all, manure, this basis of agricultural riches, must become more abundant. If more oil be consumed, it will cause an increase in the cultivation of the olive tree.
Page 77 - You are no logicians if, refusing the demi-gratuity as hurtful to human labor, you do not a fortiori, and with double zeal, reject the full gratuity. Again, when any article, as coal, iron, cheese, or cloth, comes to us from foreign countries with less labor than if we produced it ourselves, the difference in price is a gratuitous gift conferred upon us; and the gift is more or less considerable, according as the difference is greater or less. It is the quarter, the half, or the three quarters of...
Page 76 - If a Lisbon orange can be sold at half the price of a Parisian one, it is because a natural and gratuitous heat does for the one what the other only obtains from an artificial and consequently expensive one. When, therefore, we purchase a Portuguese orange, we may say that we obtain it half gratuitously and half by the right...
Page 74 - But what words can express the magnificence which Paris will then exhibit ! Cast an eye upon the future and behold the gildings, the bronzes, the magnificent crystal chandeliers, lamps, reflectors and candelabras, which will glitter in the spacious stores, compared with which the splendor of the present day will appear...

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