Heat: an elementary text-book, theoretical and practical, for colleges and schools (Google eBook)

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University Press, 1894 - Heat - 230 pages
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Page 103 - The volume of a given mass of gas at constant pressure is proportional to its absolute temperature.
Page 34 - The ratio of the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of a given mass of any substance 1 to the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of an equal mass of water 1 is called the specific heat of the substance.
Page 31 - T, ie through (Tt) degrees. Again the number of heat units required to raise m grammes of water 1 is m. Hence the number of heat units required to raise m grammes of water from t to T is m (T- t}. We thus see how to calculate either the amount of heat required to change the temperature of a given mass of water by a given number of degrees or the change in temperature produced by a given number of heat units. Example. Two quantities of water at different temperatures are mixed together,...
Page 104 - That is, the volume of a mass of gas at constant pressure is proportional to its absolute temperature. We have worked hitherto in degrees Centigrade; but since a degree Fahrenheit is of...
Page 221 - ... temperature of a gas, and describe experiments to prove them. IV. 1. Explain what is meant by the absolute zero of the air thermometer, and by absolute temperature. 2. Describe an apparatus to prove that air at constant pressure expands in volume for each degree centigrade by 1/273 of its volume atOC. 3. How would you prove experimentally that the pressure of a gas at constant volume is proportional to the absolute temperature ? 5.
Page 38 - The quantity of heat required to change 1 gramme of a substance from a solid to a liquid form without change of temperature is called the latent heat of fusion of the substance. Hence if L be the latent heat of fusion of any substance, the quantity of heat required to melt m grammes of that substance without changing its temperature is mL heat units. Now suppose that m grammes of ice are put into a calorimeter containing M grammes of water at a temperature T C. The ice, if there be not too much...
Page 230 - Books I. and II. Is. 6d., Books III. and IV. Is. 6d., Books V. and VI., Is. 6d. SALLUST. CATILINA AND JUGURTHA. With a Life.
Page 134 - Thus in this case water boils at the temperature at which the pressure of its vapour is equal to the pressure to which the liquid is subject.
Page 30 - HEAT. from 20 to 21". Experiment shews however that this is very nearly the case, and so for most purposes we may take as a Heat Unit the quantity of heat required to raise 1 gramme of water 1 C. This same amount of heat is given out by 1 gramme of water in cooling 1 C.
Page 229 - Third edition, ios. 6d. FOSSIL PLANTS, a Manual for Students of Botany and Geology By AC SEWARD, MA, FRS Two volumes, demy 8vo.

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