Historic Earls and Earldoms of Scotland (Google eBook)

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W. Jolly, 1898 - Nobility - 356 pages
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Page 107 - Who is it that causes to blow the loud winds of winter, and that calms them again in summer? Who is it that rears up the shade of those lofty forests, and blasts them with the quick lightning at his pleasure? The same Being who gave to you a country on the other side of the waters, and gave ours to us; and by this title we will defend it...
Page 107 - I have seen of them myself amongst reluctant nations submitting to our authority. I know what they feel, and how such feelings can alone be repressed. I have heard them in my youth from a naked savage, in the indignant character of a prince surrounded by his subjects, addressing the governor of a British colony, holding a bundle of sticks in his hand as the notes of his unlettered eloquence.
Page 106 - Heaven never gave, by means which it never can sanction. " Gentlemen, I think I can observe that you are touched with this way of considering the subject ; and I can account for it. I have not been considering it through the cold medium of books, but have been speaking of man and hib nature, and of human dominion, from what I have seen of them myself amongst reluctant nations submitting to our authority. I know what they feel, and how such feelings can alone be repressed.
Page 330 - We were in bed, Sir, every man, When the English host upon us came ; A bloody battle then began, Upon the haughs of Cromdale. The English horse they were sae rude, They bath'd their hoofs in Highland blood, But our brave clans they boldly stood Upon the haughs of Cromdale. But, alas ! we could no longer stay, For o'er the hills we came away, And sore we do lament the day That e'er we came to Cromdale.
Page 266 - Billie, and take care of him on my account. I must again recommend your unhappy mother to you. Comfort her, and take all the care you can of your brothers ; and may God, of his infinite mercy, preserve, guide, and conduct you and them through all the vicissitudes of this life, and after it, bring you to the habitations of the just, and make you happy in the enjoyment of Himself to all eternity.
Page 206 - Mr , a clergyman, a venerable, aged figure : the Duke makes me happier than ever great man did noble, princely, yet mild, condescending, and affable, gay and kind the Duchess witty and sensible God bless them ! Come to Cullen to lie hitherto the country is sadly poor and unimproven.
Page 107 - who is it that causes this river to rise in the high mountains and to empty itself into the ocean > Who is it that causes to blow the loud winds of winter, and that calms them again in...
Page 204 - OH, send Lewie Gordon hame, And the lad I daurna name ; Though his back be at the wa', Here's to him that's far awa' ! Ochon, my Highlandman ! O my bonnie Highlandman ! Weel would I my true-love ken Amang ten thousand Highlandmen.
Page 264 - ... uneasiness that you did not get leave to come up here, and that I could not have the pleasure of taking a long and last farewell of you. Besides the pleasure of seeing you, and giving you the blessing of a dying father, I wanted to have talked to you about your affairs more than I have strength or spirits to write. I shall therefore recommend you to George Menzies in Falkirk, and Robert Paterson in Kilmarnock, as your advisers in them, and to a state of affairs I sent to my wife, of which you...
Page 202 - Pitrichie, who have acted the Infamous part of spies and informers, and the two last especially, who have given a great deal of bad advice to a certain great man, who shall be nameless, it is neither consistent with my honour or inclination to treat them as prisoners of war. I shall take care to order supplies to be given to all the prisoners who want them, and the wounded men are as well taken care of as our own. I shall send you a list of the prisoners and wounded, with any useless papers and letters...

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