The Leaderless Revolution: How Ordinary People Will Take Power and Change Politics in the Twenty-first Century

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Blue Rider Press, 2012 - Political Science - 244 pages
11 Reviews

The Leaderless Revolution explains why our government institutions are inadequate to the task of solving major problems and offers a set of steps we can take to create lasting and workable solutions ourselves. In taking these steps, we can not only reclaim the control we have lost, but also a sense of meaning and community so elusive in the current circumstance. In a day and age when things feel bleak and beyond our control, this powerful and personal book will revive one's sense of hope that a better, more just and equitable order lies within our reach-if only we are willing to grasp it.

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Review: The Leaderless Revolution: How Ordinary People Will Take Power and Change Politics in the 21st Century

User Review  - Stormy - Goodreads

First I read Colorado Senator Morgan Carroll's book on Take Back Your Government. Empowering. Next, for our October meeting our Littleton Great Decisions Discussion Group is reading Ill Fairs the Land ... Read full review

Review: The Leaderless Revolution: How Ordinary People Will Take Power and Change Politics in the 21st Century

User Review  - Ammar Hammoudeh - Goodreads

I liked the concept of how ordinary people could be engaged to shape their political world. In other hand, the author doesn't suggest 'how to do it', alternatively, he keeps the door open for anyone to think of best way to set and apply tactical goals to achieve this strategic goal. Read full review

About the author (2012)

Carne Ross is the founder and executive director of Independent Diplomat, a nonprofit advisory group that works to foster democracy and supranational cooperation. Prior to his role there, Ross was a British Foreign Service officer for fifteen years. He worked in Bonn, and then for the UK mission to the United Nations (UN). As the UK delegation's expert on the Middle East, he was an early critic of British involvement in the Iraq war, and testified against entry in the Butler Review. After resigning in protest over this issue, he fought for human rights and rule of law in Kosovo. Ross appears frequently on the BBC, CNN, and Al Jazeera, and has written for various publications, including the Guardian and Slate. He lives in New York.

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