The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, Volumes 9-10 (Google eBook)

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Issued under the auspices of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association of the United States, 1907 - United States
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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - speaker43 - LibraryThing

This is a must have for any Jefferson fan. It contains an excellent compilation of his letters. Because he published nothing other than his Notes on the State of Virginia, one has to read his letters in order to understand his thinking. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AnneDenney - LibraryThing

What can be more interesting in terms of history as well as autobiography than reading letters and essays, notes and musings of great men, preserved to teach generations to come. This series is very well edited and beautifully bound, and we are looking forward to using these in homeschooling too. Read full review

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Page 312 - There is on the globe one single spot, the possessor of which is our natural and habitual enemy. It is New Orleans, through which the produce of three-eighths of our territory must pass to market, and from its fertility it will ere long yield more than half of our whole produce, and contain more than half of our inhabitants.
Page 175 - I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.
Page vi - In every government on earth is some trace of human weakness, some germ of corruption and degeneracy, which cunning will discover, and wickedness insensibly open, cultivate and improve. Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers of the people alone. The people themselves therefore are its only safe depositories. And to render even them safe, their minds must be improved to a certain degree.
Page 452 - A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do.
Page iv - I think the best remedy is exactly that provided by all our constitutions, to leave to the citizens the free election and separation of the aristoi from the pseudo-aristoi, of the wheat from the chaff. In general they will elect the really good and wise. In some instances, wealth may corrupt, and birth blind them ; but not in sufficient degree to endanger the society.
Page 415 - Louisiana, as ceded by France to the United States, is made a part of the United States ; its white inhabitants shall be citizens, and stand, as to their rights and obligations, on the same footing with other citizens of the United States, in analogous situations.
Page 114 - According to these bases, you were right to assert that whatever plenipotentiary the Government of the United States might send to France to put an end to the existing differences between the two countries would be undoubtedly received with the respect due to the representative of a free, independent, and powerful nation.
Page 342 - If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
Page 311 - It completely reverses all the political relations of the United States, and will form a new epoch in our political course.
Page 337 - Congress have risen," writes he. "You will have seen by their proceedings the truth of what I always observed to you, that one man outweighs them all in the influence over the people, who have supported his judgment against their own and that of their representatives. Republicanism must lie on its oars, resign the vessel to its pilot, and themselves to what course he thinks best for them.

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