The Cummings Memorial: A Genealogical History of the Descendants of Isaac Cummings, an Early Settler of Topsfield, Massachusetts (Google eBook)

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B. F. Cummings., 1903 - Cummings family (Isaac Cummings, 1601-1677) - 532 pages
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Page 51 - minute-men,' Mrs. David Wright of Pepperell, Mrs. Job Shattuck of Groton, and the neighboring women, collected at what is now Jewett's Bridge, over the Nashua, between Pepperell and Groton, clothed in their absent husbands' apparel, and armed with muskets, pitchforks, and such other weapons as they could find ; and, having elected Mrs. Wright their commander, resolutely determined that no foe to freedom, foreign or domestic, should pass that bridge. For rumors...
Page 49 - A | narrative | of the | captivity & sufferings | of | Ebenezer Fletcher, | of New-Ipswich, | who was severely wounded and taken prisoner at the battle of | Hubbardston, Vt. in the year 1777, by the British and | Indians, at the age of 16 years, after recovering in | part, made his escape from the enemy, and | travelling through a dreary wilderness...
Page 51 - Mrs. David Wright of Pepperell, Mrs. Job Shattuck of Groton, and the neighboring women, collected at what is now Jewett's Bridge, over the Nashua, between Pepperell and Groton, clothed in their absent husbands' apparel, and armed with muskets, pitchforks, and such other weapons as they could find ; and, having elected Mrs. Wright their commander, resolutely determined that no foe to freedom, foreign or domestic, should pass that bridge. For rumors were rife, that the regulars were approaching ; and...
Page 10 - One of their number had been stationed to watch each of these houses, to see that no assistance approached, and no alarm was given. A short time previous to the arrival of the cavalry, the Indian stationed at Wells' returned to his party, and reported that all was safe.
Page 10 - Wells' garrison, had his arm broken, but was so fortunate as to reach the woods while the Indians were engaged in the house. That night he lay in a swamp in the northerly part of what at present constitutes the town of Tyngsborough, about one quarter of a mile west of the great road as it now runs, and a few rods south of the State line. The next day he arrived at the garrison near the residence of the late Col. Tyng.
Page 10 - Cumrriings who was wounded had his arm broken, but was so fortunate as to reach the woods while the Indians were engaged in the house. That night he lay in a swamp in the northerly part of Tyngsborough, about a quarter of a mile west of the great road, and a few rods south of the state line. The next day he arrived at the garrison near Tyngsborough village.
Page 49 - ... by wolves, and beset by tories on | his way, who threatened to take him | back to the enemy, but made his es-|cape from them all, and arrived| safe home. | Written by himself, and published at the request of his|friends.| Fourth edition, | revised and enlarged. | New-Ipswich, NH | Printed by S. Wilder,| 1827.!
Page 255 - ... of conversation. Never did Mr. Cummings leave so delightful an impression of his character as he did that day. His disease was alarming on Monday, and began visibly to affect the vital organs. His mind became confused and disordered. In the evening was the affecting exhibition, already referred to. of the ruling passion, strong in Death. He fancied the Chinese once more before him. and for some time, till his strength failed, he proclaimed the gospel to them in their native tongue. This done,...
Page 51 - ... Whiting (the subject of this notice), on horseback, supposed to be treasonably engaged in carrying intelligence to the enemy. Whiting, by direction of Mrs. Wright in her assumed character of Sergeant of the Bridge Guard, was seized, taken from his horse, searched, and detained a prisoner. Despatches were found in his boots, which were sent to the Committee of Safety, and Whiting himself was committed to the custody of the Committee of Observation of Groton.

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